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SWARTHMORE COLLEGE 



HALCYON 



1953 



( I HIS is the record of a year, and as such 
^ it must mean most to those who have 
endured, enjoyed and exhausted it . . . but 
to you who should happen to pick up the 
book we invite a three-seasonal glimpse into 
the swarthmore of 1951 and 1952 ... the 
swarthmore of our junior year ... a series of 
events ... a place ... a group of people . . . 
and, yes ... a spirit. 



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DEDICATION 



(10 the dining room, center of local folklore, a ritual noisily endured 
^ ... on the right, on the right . . . let's go left, I hate her . . . the roar 
must frighten visitors . . . tray, fork, knife, spoon, napkin . . . save two 
seats . . . wet or dry? . . . main dishes conversation pieces; the dependable 
sequence gives feeling of security . . . what have they done to this per- 
fectly good potato? . . .the legend of friday franks . . . who doesn't want 
his butter? . . . happy birthday to you . . . sometimes it gets rough: nap- 
kins in the soup and peas in the coffee . . . let's pick up the table and carry 
it out . . . who wants ice cream? . . . hurry, maybe I can meet him acci- 
dently on the way out . . . quiet 
homey atmosphere aids peaceful di- 
gestion; I only have time for orange 
juice and half a donut . . . confused 
unity of something that nine hundred 
people have in common. 




19JJ.J9J2 



FALL 




Winter 



SPRING 



Fall 



AT SWARTHMORE 



. with shouts of have a nice sum- 
mer? and handshakes ad nauseam . . . new sophomores, juniors, and seniors disembark and 
begin the climb up magill . . . they switch suitcases from hand to hand and pant . . . some 
carefully avoid the plaque, others deliberately stamp on it . . . who planted these oaks'? . . . 
1881 . . . everything's changed a little . . . the daffodils left behind in June have succumbed 
to autumn ivy . . . soon the leaves are whirling from the trees and the walks are patterned 
in yellow and red and brown . . . then the design is broken . . . the underpass is filled 
with black ash and humid smoke . . . the smell of disinfectant in wharton mixes with that 
of the returning occupants . . . attics are always unlocked . . . rooms are becurtained and 
berugged . . . coats and ties and high heels are removed . . . the freshmen look on . . . 
wondering at the unexpected advent of so many intruders ... a final square dance and 
their three-day vacation is at an end . . . name tags fall into newly-bought waste baskets 
and classes begin . . . fall is a time of resolution . . . this year will be different . . . every- 
one is older that first week . . . but in a month you've never been away. 




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FALL 



freshman week 



homecoming 
hamburg show 



contents 



serenade 



hockey 



football 

soccer 

cross-country 





. . . freshmen are early intro- 
duced to crum . . . the first sign 
of September life therein is usu- 
ally the picnic, held on the cold- 
est afternoon of freshman week. 




. . . as fall wears ou the fresh- 
womayi is given a unicjiie oppor- 
tunity to meet the yo'u)ig men 
she may have previously missed 
or forgotten since freshman 
week . . . ' 





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. . . the process of meeting is further facilitated . . . young women emerge 
one monday breakfast adorned with cardboard . . . collection seats are 
wsga discusses the rules . . . 



assigned 



. . . the middle of november sees a brief burst of spirit, a display of 
reasonably impromptu thespic talent, and a show of the famous 
swarlhmore sporisma}iship . . . the herald of homecoming is the alumni 
couch, • which suddenly materializes in parrish and announces ^the 
conflict with haverford . . . 




SKITS-O- 
PHRENIA 




above 



left . . . the process of 
becomini; a monstei 



right . . . science marches on 



below . . . Ephron and creation 





skitsophrenia . . . Xhe hamburg shoio of 1951 . . . 
always in season in the swarthmore autumnal 
picture . . . academics suffered for the sake of 
art . . . but science marched on . . . honors, of 
course, to the forgotten men of the myriad com- 
mittees . . . three-dimensional wanderings: tem- 
poral, spatial, and in the realm of horror . . . 
rusty, mac, johnny and schizophrenic moods: 
blue . . . tragic . . . macabre . . . but still, life . . . 
1951 revision of the catalogue . . . imaginative 
music and eloquent mimicry . . . smooth per- 
formance is only schizophrenic defense mechan- 
ism for the weeks of hectic work . . . and four 
letter words . . . illogical confusion leads to 
logical conclusion: a very first class good . . . 
and it's been here, here, here, for many a year, 
year, year . . . 



below . . . Abrahams . . . Cohn 



below left . . . Grandmother 
with monster 







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FALL SPORTS 



KWINK 




WAA 



.'fflis^?s 







The 1951 Football season was eagerly awaited 
for two reasons : Swarthmore was expected to field 
a winning grid team and to play its games on the 
new Clothier field behind the field house. Neither 
of these expectations was realized but the season 
proved to be an anomaly in that it was both dis- 
appointing and promising. 

Although the season closed with a two and five 
log, all indications pointed to success in future years. 
The squad was augmented by another bright bunch 
of freshman prospects which included Henry Bode, 
Tom Simkin, Dick Burtis, Chuck Cooper and Dick 
Kohls on the line and Bill Bruce and Paul James in 
the backfield. These boys, although as 
green as the sod on unused Clothier 
field at the outset of the season, dis- 
played their wares in fine fashion at 
the close of the fall and are to be de- 
pended upon for creditable performances in the fu- 
ture. The fine all-round performances of Bill Jones 
and Bunky Blake and the scintillating running of 
Nick Cusano proved to be the highlights of the grid 
year. 

The 1951 season saw the Garnet gridmen win na- 
tional acclaim on the basis of their conduct if not 
their ability. Last year's Haverford game saw for 
the first time in the history of football a game scored 
on the basis of the conduct of the players and fans 



FOOTBALL 



as well as the more usual playing tactics. If a victory 
over Haverford is the mark of a successful then this 
season must god down in the record books as a 
double victory because the 'fords were vanquished 
19-7 on the f^eld of combat and 45-43 on the field 
of conduct. 

Last fall coach Lew Elverson junked his T-forma- 
tion in favor of a Princeton type single-wing offense 
which showed to advantage with Bill Jones at tail- 
back. Dave Hansen and Mike Freilich at fullback, 
little Nick Cusano at wingback, and Frank Oski un- 
til injured in the blocking back position. Dana 
Swan took over the signal calling chores after Oski's 
injury in the Johns Hopkins game. The 
offensive line had Dave Harvey and 
Bunkey Blake at end. Hank Bode and 
Tom Simkin at tackle. Jay Ochroch 
and Bill Walls at guard, and Captain 
Bob Asplundh at center. Big Asplundh received the 
Maxwell Award for his splendid performance in the 
Haverford game and proved to be a worthy succes- 
sor to his father, the great Lester Asplundh, by his 
fine play all year. 

The Garnet opened its season by losing a heart- 
breaker in ninety-degree heat to a fine Juniata ball 
club, 13-7. Swarthmore had a touchdown nullified 
because of a freak pass interference call, and this 
tough break proved to be the ball game. Bill Jones 




indicated in the opener that he would be an offensive 
standout all year by spearheading the Garnet attack 
on its many long marches. Dave Hansen, transfer 
from Columbia, scored the lone touchdown for 
Swarthmore. 

Lew Elverson took his boys on the second Satur- 
day of the season to Staten Island where they won 
their game, downing Wagner College 75-70. The 
Garnet looked impressive in this victory by coming 
from behind twice to clinch the game. 

The following Saturday saw the 
squad play their best game of the sea- 
son although they bowed to Ursinus 
25-20. Nick Cusano put on a one-man 
show, gaining close to 150 yards on 
his own. Although Swarthmore domi- 
nated play in all four periods, a few 
breaks by the Bears turned the tide of 
battle. The game featured fine passing 
by Bill Jones and splendid defensive 
work by the entire forward wall. 

Three successive defeats followed the bright 
showing of the early part of the season. A powerful 
Franklin and Marshall team rolled over the Garnet 
5-13. The following week Johns Hopkins routed 
Swarthmore 39-6 and then Drexel came along with 
a 35-6 victory. Neither of these clubs deserved to 
win by such a large margin of victory, but the boys 




just lacked that necessary spark. Bill Jones, Bunky 
Blake, Bill Bruce, Bill Walls, and Nick Cusano played 
well even in defeat. 

A return to early season form occurred in the 
traditional finale against a winless Haverford eleven. 
After a scoreless first quarter played entirely in Ha- 
verford territory, Swarthmore got rolling and scored 
twice in quick succession in the second period, with 
Bill Jones, Nick Cusano, and Mike Freilich bearing 
the brunt of the offensive burden. In the third 
quarter Haverford finally managed to 
get posession of the ball in Swarth- 
more territory as a result of a re- 
covered fumble, and they quickly 
drove across for a score. Swarthmore 
scored again in the same period and 
the game ran its course without any 
further excitement, although Swarth- 
more Ev Burn attempted a field goal 
in the last quarter. Final score, 19-7. 
The Haverford game marked the last 
contest for seniors Bob Asplundh, Dick de Charms, 
Dave Hansen, Ev Burn, Chuck Valsing, and lohnny 
Miller. 

The offensive backfield proved more than ade- 
quate. With the majority of these boys returning 
and with the employment of the revitalized attack, 
look for big things from the Garnet eleven. 



VARSITY: Back row, kft to right . . . Dunn, coach . . . Flemister, faculty advisor . . . F. Kyle 
. . . Carraday . . . Craig . . . Snyder . . . Kipp . . . Martin . . . Bahr, asst. coach: Second row 
. . . Sediono . . . Wilmott . . . Swayne . . . S. Clark ... A. Lewis ... A. Lewis . . . Smucker: 
7ront row . . . T. Jones . . . U. Attuanya . . . Lohr . . . Wright . . . Carroll . . . Wilkison 
. . . Place. 




The Garnet soccer team after getting off to a flying start had its wings clipped 
a few times at the end of the season but still emerged with a very fine record. After 
compiling seven straight victories the team bowed to Navy 2-0, and ten days 

(^ y^^ y^^, >-r->T^ '^^^'' ^^'^^ upset by an underdog Haverford team 5-1. This latter 

S( )( ( H K '"^ss through the southern division of the Middle Atlantic Con- 

ference into a four-way tie between Swarthmore, Haverford, 
Lehigh and Rutgers. In the first round of the play-offs the Garnet got sweet 
revenge for its previous defeat by whipping Haverford 3-2, but a defeat by Lehigh, 
beaten during the regular season, eliminated them from the finals. 

Freshman Jim White turned out to be the big gun on offense as he scored 15 
goals to pace the hooters. Dave Wilkison, another freshman, gave indications of 
brillance, and he along with newcomers Dick Kipp and Frank Martin should 
be a big help in the seasons to come. Inglesis, another newcomer, won himself a 
starting berth by virtue of his outstanding footwork. 



Captain Steve Clark along with a vastly improved Joe Carroll and husding 
George Place were the bright lights and were complimented by a whole array of 
fine ball-players including Art Lewis, Andy Lewis, Stu Lohr, Tom Jones, John 
Smucker, Phile Swayne, Sediono Serjo and LI. O. Atuanya. 

The Dunnmen started things off on the right foot by defeating an Alumni 
team loaded with great talent. The Garnet then defeated a strong Penn team 3-1, 
in the second contest, and rolled on to victories over Rutgers, Princeton, Unrinus, 
Stevens and Lehigh. The Lehigh game was probably the high spot of the season 
as the squad played inspired ball and came from a .3-1 deficit to down the Engi- 
neers 4-3. 

The injury suffered by George Place in the Stevens game proved to be of 
great importance in the late season decline of the team. 




JUNIOR VARSITY: Back row, kjt (o riciht . . . Hartzell . . . Thompson . . . Milam . . . Millman . . . 
Phillipides . . . Burbank . . . Sieverts . . . Fink: Second row . . . Conrow . . . Cowell . . . Kipp 
. . . Hallberg . . . Laws . . . Stetkewyz . . . F. Kyle . . . Strachan: '.Trotif row . . . Dominick . . . 
Sielman . . . Craig . . . Snyder . . . B. Jones . . . Frost . . . Martin . . . Bahr, coach 



■Standing . . . Van der Veen, manager . . . Heagle . 
Young . . . David . . . Brown . . . Snyder, manager 
Loucks . . . Hastings . . . Harrington . . 



. . Friedman . . . Camp . . . Rosenblatt 

. . Miller, coach, kneeling . . . Strauss 
Sullivan . . . Dukakis . . . Irish. 





The best adjective to describe the 1951 cross 
country squad is graduation-ridden. The loss of 
Cheyney, Spaulding and Stabler left a hole that 
could not be filled by the remaining 
members of the team. Captain Ave Har- 
rington continued his fine winning form, 
always leading the team, and winning 
three dual meets. Behind him, George 
Hastings, whose meteoric rise to star- 
dom was the feature of the year, 
Chuck Loucks, and newcomers 
Mike Dukakis, John Strauss and 
Charlie Sullivan were the usual scorers. 
The team wound up with a won two, 
lost four record, beating Lafayette and 
F & M. Coach Jim Miller had his hands 
full developing stars of future years from 
the great number of Freshmen who 
turned out for the sport. 



CROSS 
COUNTRY 



HOCKEY 





■Back TOW . . . Nichol . . . Dun . . . Richardson . . . Lichtman , . . Mallonee . . . Winde . . . 
Sicherman . . . Abernethy . . . Voysey . . . Salas . . . Hutcheson, manager, second row . . . 
Strandberg . . . Leiand . . . Sharpless . . . Webster . . . Slaugh . . . Taylor ... Hay . . . S. Smith; 
Prst row... Bushman . . . Buel . . . Richards . . . Wheeler . . Woford . . MacMillan . . D'Emilio. 



Winter 



AT SWARTHMORE ... the shortest season 
. . . punctuated by vacations and exams . . ,. everyone turns indoors . . . coats and scarves 
overflow underneath the feet of the lunch line and are crushed . . . even the library is 
crowded ... in commons chessmen click all day and typewriters all night . . . outside 
sharp winds . . . and sometimes snow . . . once in four years, perhaps, snow lies heavy on 
the trees ... the lawn is white and smooth . . . then sleds, emerging from the basement, 
cover it with criss-cross trails . . . and then it's all over . . . suddenly it's march and seaweed-like 
daffodils go down once more beneath a last snow . . . but their presence has been detected by 
unbelieving observers and winter is on the way out . . . 




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contents 



wrestling 
basketball 



women s 
winter sports 



WINTER 



Othello 

the male animal 

the toy shop 



swimming 




OTHELLO 



. . . jay finkle as the moor . . . jim cox as iago . . . carol thompson as desde- 

mona ... we say Itc's most ambitious undertaking in many seasons: a truly 

excellent production of shakespeare's othetlo . . . director lange's mangificent 

conception of the play . . . excellent handling 

of technical matters . . . seven weeks of heavy 

rehearsing ... a performance both polished and 

plausible ... a standard for years to come . . . 

the greatest nobility . . . the bottomless hate . . . 

the perfect wife . . . but we saw human beings, 

not gods and devils in the flesh. . . 

the marvelous interplay between cox and 
finkel . . . one drop of poison after another . . . 
the jealousy grows and grows . . . othello "in- 
telligently unaware" ... we see the schemes . . . 
and understandable strokes of luck ... we could 
almost feel the tradegy grow. . . 

Othello: a man of superhuman passions ... a 
truly noble person . . . but jay let us see the 
tortured mind . . . the strength . . . the doubt . . . 
the weakness . . . the competent general . . . the 
husband who loved too well . . . the chink: 
jealousy . . . deftly handled . . . beautifully de- 
veloped. . . 

iago: often the height of the melodramatic 
villian . . . overplayed and unbelievable . . . 
but with cox, a many-sided suavity . . . blank 
verse became speech . . . and we were entranced 
a difficult part. . . 




consistent excellence in 




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desdemona: carol takes a weak angel and makes her warmly human . . . 
she can be coy . . . she can joke ... or a "paragon of virtue" . . . she loves 
him and can't understand . . . and we sympathize with her . . . 

cassio ... "a good man" . . . phil price, whose love for the general isn't 
diminished by his relief . . . bunny peterken's emilia gives us a peek at more 
intelligence than we had suspected ... a dutiful wife until she learns, too late 
. . . and shows us a boundless love for her mistress . . . bianca . . . nothing 
like a shot of sex to pick up a show . . . sue weil played it to the hilt . . the 
comic tramp with curves . . . who blames cassio? ... we wish we could have 
laughed more at charles torrey ... his roderigo was wonderful ... a greedy 

fool . . . the perfect instrument . . . oh, he was 
so mad! . . . exceedingly well-cudgeled . . . 
highest honors . . . dico carle gave us a duty- 
bound mantano ... we appreciated his position 
. . . another half-inch in the duel and it would 
have been real . . . martin david as lodovico 
settled any questions in our mind at the show's 
end . . . paul noyes, a gratiano with perfect 
diction . . . trust george papanek to put a char- 
acter across, big or small ... we chuckled at 
his crochety brabantio . . . listened attentively 
as he pled with the decisive 
duke, mort miller . . . and his 
grief over his daughter's mar- 
riage stayed with us ... an 
added touch of poignancy . . . 
we were impressed by the 
midnight blue drapes ... the 
simple, yet immensely effec- 
tive sets . . . the colorful ac- 
curacy of the costumes . . . 
and that delightful turquoise 

Lr^'^^^^^^SSffS^ curtain on the inner prosceni- 
^. '^^H^^^SH um...sets designed by caroly 
'^ ^^^Jk ^ wilcox, constructed by david, 

^ ■•**^^ paxOn, manglesdorf and crew 

. . . lighting by anita mangels 
. . . impressive costuming by 
cole and buenger . . . sally 
andrews and patty, welch put 
in long hours as stage man- 
agers ... it paid off . . . thanks, 
barbara. . . 





THE MALE ANIMAL 



. . . thurber and nugent animal had all the humor and insight of waiter mitty 
and a social message besides . . . subjecting both football-crazed trustees and 
would-be sea lions to the same benignly satirical treatment, the male beast was 
shown frustrated by his mate and the trustee frustrated by academic freedom 
. . . larry lafore, as professor tommy turner, cornered penquin, fought for wife 

and freedom, skilfully slinging the raw meat 
over his shoulder in the best cro-magnon tra- 
dition . . . crusading teacher or skulking beast 
he was an undiluted delight throughout . . . 
helen north, as his wife, was, to speak platon- 
ically, the universal essence of woman, and 
wonderful . . . philip prager played a magnifi- 
cently baffled joe ferguson . . . lucius shero an 
admirably apoplectic alumnus . . . John teall's 
unconfused liberal and suzanne newlin's level- 
headed coed introduced the slightly post- 
adolescent aspect of the animal question . . . 
also pointing up the political and social prob- 
h.ite-;. \_ 1_^^'-' ~^.''K^ igj^g q{ student life at nasty old reactionary 

colleges . . . dean damon, confused liberal, 
was sympathetically played by leonard eisen- 
bud . . . barbara colbrun and elizabeth harrar as a fine pair of peritoneum- 
poking faculty wives . . . george test deliciously dimwitted as the all-american 
hopeful . . . dave peele and nutsy neisser stimulating several interesting re- 
sponses ... an outstanding success . . . not only artistically . . . but financially 
raising five hundred dollars for the scholar- 
ship fund . . . laurels to the faculty as a whole, 
for their pertinent choice ... to the stage 
crew, for among other things, skilful repro- 
duction of the water tower . . . and to barbara 
lange, well-deserved recipient of curtain call 
flowers. . . 






presented by the faculty, Barbara Lange directing 



THE TOY SHOP 



. . . nineteen chlorine chorines . . . drippy hair, drippy noses . . . under 
co-captains hearst and likert . . . big show in december . . . toy shop . . . 
dolls from everywhere, Siamese, Viennese and just plain sleepy . . . plenty of 
music, lights, costumes and teamwork . . . small formation for 
swimming meets . . . skit for waa . . . invitations to penn . . . ex- 
perimental competition for aau . . . losing seven seniors: nancy, 
bev and lucia; two judies, demond and harvey . . . plus two late- 
comers, sue slaugh and jill . . . leaving twelve mermaids . . . co- 
captains betsy and helga . . . margie and nancy gibbons . . . sopho- 
mores phus, helene, sue and shirley . . . finally four freshmen, kat, 
Jackie, judy and jean ... the show will go on and on and . . . 






WINTER SPORTS 



Standing . . . Beatty . . . Bach, coach . . . Hastings . . . Temin . . . Clark . . . Strachan . . . Fetter 
Strauss . . . Conrow . . . Levine; kneeling . . . Laws . . . Phillipides . . . Shepard . . . C. Jones 

Heaton . . . Freilich . . . Bode. 



ONDEft ARM 

WHl22E:ft 

QcOKLE VJHia 




WRESTLING 



The 1951-52 season saw the Bachmen register their first wrestling win in 
14 matches. The Garnet matmen won 18-12 over Johns Hopkins for the first 
time in the rivalry between the schools. Hank Bode, a bright freshman pros- 
pect, and Mike Freilich proved themselves the "winningest" members of the 
squad. Bode tasting defeat only twice during the course of the season. Captain 

Mike Laws held down the 123-pound slot and 
ended the season by copping a medal in the 
Middle Atlantics. Howard Temin filled in at 
this weight while Mike was 
ill. Other members of the 
squad included Flip Phillipi- 
des (130), Bill Shepard, Pres Brown (137), Buck 
Jones (147), Bob Fetter, Gene Heaton (157), 
Mike Freilich, George Hastings (167), Hank 
Bode (177), and heavyweights U. O. Atuanya 
and Ben Beattie. Ben was a pleasant surprise in 
his heavyweight slot and was showing great 
improvement at the close of the season. 





played well during the course of the season. 
Captain Place proved a fine leader, but the 
squad just couldn't cope with the competition 
because of their lack of height. Coach Howard 
Sipler got fine performances from Babe Hall- 
burg and Dave Wilkison, both freshmen with 
bright futures. Bill Pratt and Dana Swan proved 
themselves capable reserves while Dick Millman 
displayed flashes of brilliance during the course 
of the season. 

BASKETBALL 



WINTER 1952 

The Garnet quintet experienced a 
rather dismal season posting victories 
over only Lehigh, Ursinus, Drexel, 
and Haverford in a fo.urteen-game 
card. The season's only bright spot 
was the scintillating play of prolific 
Hoosier Joe Carroll. Joe was up 
among the leaders for District scoring 
honors and was rewarded with a 
berth on the All-Philadelphia squad. 
Joe completed the season with a 21.9 
average. Tom Jones helped carry the 
Garnet scoring burden with a total 
of 145 points for the season. Cap- 
tain George Place and Marc Merson 




JUNIOR VARSITY 



Back row . . . Preston . . . C. Cooper . . . 
Gilleland . . . Whitaker . . . Resnig . . . 
Henderson; front row . . . Meyer . . . 
Schilling . . . W. Jones . . . Dukakis 
. . . Price . . . James. 





WOMEN'S 
SWIMMING 




Back row . . . Withrow . . . S. White . . . Dunlevy . . . Perkins . . . Gulick 

. . . Rosekrans . . . Richardson . . . Victor . . . Dinny Rath, coach, 

front row ... J. Elliott . . . Carver . . . Richards . . . Morrel . . . Keay 

. . . Culin . . . Ore. 





Back row . . . Baker . . . Schiller . . . Marcus . . . Ornstein 
... Lenthall; front row ... Commins, manager . . . D. 
Potter . . . S. Cooper . . . Hobart . . . Burbank . . . Snyder 
. . . Laux . . . Tomlinson . . . Friedericy . . . Holloway . . . 
Chang . . . Craig. 



SWIMMING 




Jimmy McAdoo's mermen from high above Crum's water had a mod- 
erately successful season, winning four and losing four. 

Lehigh and Delaware trounced the Garnet splashers while Franklin and 
Marshall, and Lafayette gained victories that were in doubt at least during 
part of the meet. West Chester was edged by Swarthmore 50-39 in one of 
the season's better meets. Dickinson, Temple, and PMC were swamped in 



the Swarthmore wake. The Garnet then 
took a fifth place in the Middle Atlantics 
behind Lafayette, Lehigh, Delaware, and 
F & M, the four teams which beat 
Swarthmore during the regular season. 

Highlights of the season were Dave 
Potter's record-setting 24.5 second 50- 
yard freestyle win and John Ridland's 
1:46.3 150-yard individual medley win 
which also set a college record. Both 
records were set in the Lafayette meet. 

Swarthmore's one-sided victory over 
Dickinson was featured by John Rid- 
land, who normally competes in the 
backstroke and breaststroke events, 
winning the 440 freestyle. In the first meet of the sea- 
son against Temple, John Strauss won the 440 although 
he hadn't swum at all for four months. John finished 
the season with wrestling. 




Co-captain elect Hans Friedericy broke 25 seconds 
several times in the 50-yard dash. Bill Holloway con- 
tinued to improve his backstroke performances of last 
year. Co-captains Dick Tomlinson and Ross Snyder 
raced commendably in the freestyle sprints, along with 
sophomore Rich Laux, and the freestyle relay. Bill Reid 
conquered his teammate 
George Chang in the 200- 
yard breast stroke for the 
first time in three years of 
varsity competition. Scott 
Cooper and Art Levy han- 
dled most of the freestyle dis- 
tance events. Two newcom- 
ers, Tim Craig and Cott Ho- 
bart, were McAdoo's divers. 
McAdoo is looking for bet- 
ter things for next year from 
a team which may not have 
as much depth as this year's 
team, but should display 
more of that essential team 
spirit. 




WOMEN'S SPORTS - WINTER 




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BASKETBALL 



Back row . . . Brock . . . Bradley ... J. Turner . . . Passoth . . . Borwn . . . Webster . . . Wheeler 
. . . Evarts . . . Irene Moll, coach, second row . . . Mallonee . . . Barrera . . . MacMillan . . . 
Abemethy . . . Woford . . . Sicherman ... A. Smith; first row . . . D'Emilio . . . Dun . . . Donow 

... Yost . . . Manson . . . Piper. 



Back row . . . Boden . . . Todd . . . Irene Moll, coach . . . Mangels . . . Hand; second row 
Stone . . . Farrell . . . S. Harvey . . . Morey; j\rst row . . . Goodrich . . . Bok . . . Murphey . 

Hunter . . . Henderson. 



VOLLEY BALL 

•p. 





BADMINTON 



Back row . . . Benson . . . Hay . . . Woford . . . Jones . . . Morrel . . . May Parry, coach, second 
row . . . Buel . . . Evans . . . Bopp . . . Kudo . . . Meyer; first row . . . Leland . . Scutt . . . 

MacDonald . . . Grinnell. 



u) VTTVl^ AT SWARTHMORE . . . 

. . . sitting on the fire escapes .of parrish and swinging its feet, waiting to come down . . 
commons is deserted as the annual exodus to crum and the front lawn begins again . . . 
guitars on the porch at night . . . spring at swarthmore, sprawling barefoot outside the 
libe . . . swarthmore's young writers pour out their souls in one act . . . while the more 
extroverted turn to roccatorso and its famed kick chorus '. . . temporary excitement over 
may queen, and rather bleak anticipation of the accompanying parent's day . . . (mr. hicks, 
I'd like you to meet my mother . . . yes, isn't it a perfect day? . . . and that inevitable 
punch . . . ) temporarily, coming exams are forgotten . . . where will you be this summer? 
. . . my god, how fabulous — I'm working in New York . . . and sun-bathing on the roof . . . 
then, the pressure's on . . . people gunning for highest, people just trying to pass . . . 
what do you know about this guy Johnson from nyu? ... I have poli sci and history all in 
one day ... I have five papers to write in the next four days . . . somehow, we live . . . 
while the long soft winds ruffle our blue books . . . and the couples wander off to crum . . . 



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SPRING 



father unknown 
one acts 



may day 



spring sports 



contents 



folk festival 
work day 



graduation 










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FATHER 



= UNKNOWN 



second semester saw a farce . . . father un- 
known ... a bit of russian confusion deftly 
handled by Itc . . . on the part of the audience, 
a succession of smiles punctuated by outright 
laughter ... on the part of the performers, per- 
formances that generally saved the day 

sue weil as manya . . . consistently charming 
and convincing as the somewhat unconvincing 
new-age heroine . . . with sue a gaiety and ease 
which served to carry the show through many 
of its more difficult moments . . . overall a sub- 
tlety uncommon to farce, but highly refreshing, 
the suitors . . . hughlett, merson, papanek 
. . . three who scored in parts ranging from the 
love sick poet to the middle aged roue with 
something of a past . . . three characters, almost 
people, solidly entertaining . . . highlights: the 
moans of hughlett, the pantomime of merson, 
the ineffectual puffs of pananek 

vitality applies to chuck cooper's yakov . . . 
but even more a highly appreciated sense of 
presence which made him a favorite in the first 
as well as the last row . . . combined with an 
ever present sense of the comic . . . every ounce 
of promise drawn out of the mediocrity of the 
written part 

the best lines, per se, fell to the pre-revolu- 
tionary parents . . . and their interplay was in 
every respect one of the brightest moments of 
the whole performance . . . judy wubnig as 
mama effectively brought to life the conflict 
which was the theme of the play . . . paul noyes 
virtually stole his scenes as papa ... his pres- 
ence on stage was a delight ... his handling of 
the comic situation superb throughout . . . with 
him even shvarkin's melodramic social side- 
lights and reminiscences lost their performance- 
upsetting qualities 

the long list of show stoppers is ended and 
perhaps crowned by sally andrews and jean gould . . . two very different 
kind of women . . . sally's worldly midwife, regretably brief, gave real comic 
life to a scene perhaps necessary but hardly written with an inspired pen . . . 
jean's stomachy innocence and her delightfully insipid howling proved at all 
times evocatively mirthful 

behind it all barbara lange . . . holding some in line . . . pulling others 
out . . . and generally supervising a smoothness so necessary to farce 



ONE ACTS 



four plays fought it out . . . selected by 
professors hicks and becker . . . student play- 
wrights . . . contest by book and key . . . pro- 
ductions by Itc . . . judging by the audience . . . 
a tense and exiting evening with the spirit of 
competition running high . . . amazing variety 
of subject and tone . . . convincing acting aided 
by dramatic sets and intelligent direction 

the bashful bootlegger by mary white . . . 
southern local color . . . what'll it be, girls — 
security or romance? . . . john ridland . . . dana 
cole . . . jill morrel . . . george bastings . . . jack 
hughlett . . . direction: sally schneckenberger 

shadows of liberty written and directed by 
daphne lucas . . \ sincere presentation of the 
immigrant's difficulties on ellis island . . . hugh 
nissensen . . . sally andrews . . . anne buenger 
. . . carol elkins 

steamer to illjria by denny alward . . . 
tickets anyone . . . problems, solutions and sur- 
realism . . . martin david . . . bunny peterkin 
. . . harry blackstone . . . margery bodansky . . . 
bob davidson 

united we stood by marc merson and vie 
navasky . . . frank faculty satire . . . are you 
now or have you ever been . . . don tayer . . . 
rusty smith . . . chuck torrey . . russ ferrell . . . 
bob grossman . . . direction: george papanek 

results of the evening: united we stood, 
steamer to illyria on top . . . cash to budding 
playwrights 





FOLK FESTIVAL 



. . april 18 and the seventh an- 
nual activities commence . . . 



. . music fills the field 
house, two nights in 
row . . . moves to b 
with the Sunday 
session and lands 
clothier where dyer 
bennett holds 
sway. . . 





. . the spirit of swarth- 
more in sneakers, with a 
smattering of foreign folk 
and a surfeit of guitars... 
for some the essence of 
sophistication, studied 
informality... for others 
a chance to exhibit 
that long repressed 
catcall, that red ban- 
dana ... for all a 
couple of days of a 
kind of abandon 
perhaps new and 
certainly refresh- 
ing .. . 







WORK DAY 

... a minimum of work ... a 
maximum of picnicing, accident- 
al swimming and even unity . . . 
a tribute to the organizers . . . 
a pleasure to the participants . . . 
a success. . . 




^'i.^i 




MAY FIRST 






may 1 . . . call me early, mother 
. . . swarthmore's only queen 
cjua cjueen . . . and a host of less- 
er honorary posts elected and 
dressed for incoming outsiders 
and frustrated freshmen. . . . this 
year sylvia hand reigned . . . 
while nymphs (from women's 
gym classes) about her danced 
. . . beauty and the parents; all 
on the same day . . . punch and 
cookies in worth quad . . . ques- 
tions answered and questions 
raised . . . then back to dun- 
garees. . . 




Swarthmore women'! . . . yes! . . . 
Mamie Law . . . Kate Sasse . . . 
Ann Bradley . . . Sylvia Hand, cjueen 
of the may . . . Anne Schick . . . 
Jo Piper . . . Kay Eagle. 



HONORARY 
SOCIETIES 



MORTAR BOARD 
Amy Blatchford 
Nancy Boden 
Frances Commins 
Elizabeth Daugherty 
Esther Fiske 
Rosemary Foulger 
Maxine Frank 
Nell Goldstein 
Sylvia Hand 
Lucia Langthorn 
Jennifer Lee 
Beverly Miller 
Nancy Pawell 
Suzanne Slaugh 
Barbara Smith 
Vivianne Thimann 
Cornelia Wheeler 
Carolyn Wilcox 
Barbara Wolff 



BOOK AND KEY 
Evans H. Burn 
James F. Cox 
E. Jay Finkel 
Richard Hall 
Avery R. Harrington 
David Potter 
Thomas A. Reiner 
Laurie W. Seaman 
John R. Smucker 
D. Charles Valsing 
Richard C. Willmott 



SIGMA TAU 
Albert Fernandez 
David H. Lemke 
Arthur R. Lewis 
Edward Paxon 
George W. Place 
W. John Porter, Jr. 
Michael S. Remorenko 
Henry Rueger 
Lewis L. Tanguy 



SIGMA XI 

Joan Berkowitz 

Peter Calingaert 

Maxine Frank 

Jack Hahn 

David Henry Lemke 

Arthur R. Lewis 

Barbara Anne Lower 

Laura Caroline Maurer 

Jack Nachmias 

Edward Paxon 

William John Porter, Jr. 

David Dickinson Potter 

Robert Blake Reeves 

Michael Samuel Remorenko 

Vivianne Thimann 

Richard Curtis Willmott 

Louis Marshall Winer 

Barbara Claire Wolff 



PHI BETA KAPPA 
Robert Ray Ammerman 
Joan Berkowitz 
Peter Calingaert 
Woodward Lee Carter 
Thomas Frederick Dernberg 
Sandra Lord Detwiler 
Maxine Frank 
Paul Morton Gaston 
S. G. Whittle Johnson 
Ronald Winthrop Jones 
Janet Letts 
Miriam Anna Lewin 
Laura Caroline Maurer 
Christine Parker 
David Dickinson Potter 
Robert Blake Reeves 
Mary Alzina Stone 
Vivianne Thimann 
Richard Curtis Willmott 
Louis Marshal Winer 
Barbara Claire Wolff 




the middle of may and the rush begins . . . seemingly the same as 
before, but to a sizable proportion of swarthmoreans the last of its kind 
... a week or more-, seniors not seen for studying, 511115 sleep, sans 
social life . . . then a wholesale emergence for exams, dragging type- 
writer tables through halls, wearing coats and ties for orals 

comps over, and a tense Saturday for honors people . . . afternoon 
drinking bouts or bridge games, or just nail-biting . . . seven o'clock 
and the list is posted . . . eight o'clock and seniors, perhaps beaten and 
glum, but relieved, disperse, given a week to digest four years of 
swarthmore and prepare for coming ceremonies . . . meal-times shrink, 
breakfast at eight-fifteen ... all exams over, lowerclassmen leave . . . 
parrish a deserted country house 

but ground crews are at work . . . the grass is finely cut and 
strewn with small circles of rented chairs . . . flowers blossom on 
dining-room tables . . . alumni are ushered in for the day ... a day 
incomprehensible to remaining students who wander about, a trifle 




lost, gape and sometimes hide . . . music and chicken salad on the 
lawn . . . class of ninety-two on mrs. neal's porch . / . balloons and caps 
at two . . . financial doings in the amphitheater at three . . . tea at four 

a quick sunday morning breakfast and seniors are back for a busy 
day . . . some suntanned, some married, all rested . . . rehearsal in the 
amphitheater at nine . . . nason, hunt and cobbs at their scintillating 
best . . . malin at eleven . . . phi beta kappa at three . . . tea at four, 
parents taking the place of departed alumni . . . dresden at seven, a 
last collection of mutual goodbyes 

monday and more parents . . . this time the amphitheater is full 
and it's no rehearsal . . . the dignitaries march in, the faculty, the seniors 
. . . dark kerr voices an eloquent plea . . . awards . . . then diplomas . . . 
then it's all over . . . my god, we're alumni . . . reactions vary from 
broad grins to near tears . . . and several hundred ex-undergraduates 
march out to commence . . . 




SPRING SPORTS 





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Back ro(D . . . Dunn, coach, Sipler, 
coach . . . Swan . . . Roeder . . . Jones 



Although the Dunnmen only posted one victory this 
spring, the season might be termed a success. The reason 
for this seeming contradiction is the fact that the lone 
victory came over Haverford in the closing game. The 
team played all along a better brand of ball than their 
record would indicate. Paced at the plate by the big bat 
of firstbaseman Dick Roeder, he was assisted by the able 
stickwork of Tom Jones and Elmer Winkler. The infield 
consisted of Roeder at first, smooth fielding John Bennett 
at second, freshman Babe Hallberg at short and Captain 
and spark-plug George Place at third. Patrolling the outer 
gardens were veteran Elmer Winkler, sensational Chuck 
Cooper and Rusty Snyder. Tex Clendenin and Arnold 
Ludwig also saw action. Behind the mask was Dana Swan, 
dependable holler-guy for the Garnet nine. On the mound 

during the course of the season 
was bell-weather Tom Jones, 
Leighton Whitaker and Paul 
James. Both James and Whitaker 
were pleasant surprises and por- 
tend better things for next spring's 
diamondmen. 



BASEBALL 



. . . Cooper . . . Macy 


. . . Tacuber, 


manager, second row . . 


. Hallberg . . . 


Sielman . . . Dukakis . . 


Whitaker . . . 


Fristorm . . . Dominick . 


. . Bennett . . . 


James . . . Clendenin . . . 


Snyder; front 


row . . . Winkler . 


. . Place. 






Captain and All-American Bunky Blake led the 1952 
stickmen to the Pennsylvania-Delaware State Champion- 
ship. Highlights of the season were the opening game 
victory over a strong Washington College squad and a 
later thrilling see-saw tilt with Drexel. The season log 
showed eight victories and two defeats. The defeats came 
at the hands of the Army juggernaut, 15-8, and a heart- 
breaking loss to Loyola with a score of 11-10. 

Standouts on a fine all-round team were Bunky 
Blake, who led the nation in scoring, Orville Wright, 
runner-up for national assist honors, and Halsey Frost, 
tricky little attackman. Until the time of 
his injury, Steve Clark displayed a 
scrappy brand of ball and was reward- 
ed with a berth on the South squad in 
the annual North-So-uth All-Star con- 
test. Bob Greist, Fred Kvle, Dave Har- 
vey and Joe Carroll turned in commendable performances 
in mid-field positions and were ably assisted in the de- 
fensive posts by Bill Fitts, Bob Rogers, Phil Swayne and 
Pete Heagle. Bright freshman additions to the team were 
Al Douglas, Larry Handley and Jim White. Bill Hollo- 
way and Tim Craig proved themselves fine substitutes in 
the attack of Coach Ave Blake's Garnet ten. 



LACROSSE 














'->*■ 



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Back row . . . Blake, coach . . . Decker . . . F. Kyle . . . E. W'allach . . . Franck . . . G. Smith 
. . . Harvey . . . Wright . . . Kohls . . . Merin . . . Henderson . . . W. Gallagher . . . Rodgers . . . 
. . . Rosenblatt, manager . . . "Tave," trainer: secoiui row . . . T. Gallagher , . . Jenkins . . . 
White . . . Clark . . . Blake . . . Carroll . . . Griest . . . Heagle . . . Ochroch; front row . . . 
Swayne . . . Young . . . Holloway . . . Craig . . . Frost . . . Oski . . . Fitts . . . Heaton . . . Davis 

. . . Handley. 



Lew Elverson's 1952 edition of the Springclads won 
one triangular meet, that with Drexel and Ursinus, and one 
dual meet with Johns Hopkins and ended up on the short 
end of the score in four other contests. The team had 
many fine individual performers but lacked the necessary 
depth to walk away from the opposition. Standouts on 
the squad were the javelin hurling of Bill Jones, who 
bettered his own school mark with a toss of 192' 7'/2", 
and Tony Mason, freshman speedster who set a school 
mark in the 220 with a clocking of 21.8 seconds. Avery 
Harrington was a dependable performer in the mile and 
two mile events and Bob Howell could 
always be counted on in the pole vault. 
John Hopfield in the high jump and 
co-captain Ev Burn in the shot were 
consistently above average in their 
showings. Co-captain Laurie Seaman 
turned in many fine broad jumps. Ken Roberts, Rich 
Laux and Bill Bruce proved themselves fine cindermen, 
and Coach Elverson has much to look forward to in the 
coming year. 



TRACK 





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Back row . . . Morgan, nianaifer . . . Drum, coflcli . . . Preston . . . Bode . . . Simkin . . . Hoptield 
. . . Fink . . . Sullivan . . . Yag . . . Pillard . . . Elverson, coach . . . Laws, manager, second 
row . . . Preston . . . Cornell . . . Mason . . . Roberts . . . Head . . . Follett . . . Bruce; front row 
. . .Harrington . . . Thorn . . . Howell . . . Seaman . . . Burn . . . Tomlinson . . . Laux . . . W. Jones. 




Standing . . . Faulkner* coach . . . Levine . . . Wentworth . . . Coss . 
kneeling . . . Haskell . . . Lande . . . R. Jones. 



Taylor . . . Paterson; 




The tennis team proved one of the few bright spots in an other- 
wise poor sports year on the Garnet campus. Dropping only two 
contests, they piled up ten victories in the spring. The losses came 
at the hands of Penn and Haverford. 

Sparking the squad was Freshman whiz Tim Coss, who com- 
pleted the season undefeated. Coss rose to great heights in 
beating Hubinger of Lafayette, previously undefeated and con- 
sidered one of the best players in the state. Captain Studs 
Taylor played the number two slot and played it well. Went- 
worth, Lande, Jones and Haskell, in that order, filled out the 
singles berths. Dave Haskell, also a freshman, played excellent 
tennis and can be counted on in the future. 

Taylor and Coss teamed up in the number one 
doubles combination and went through the season 
undefeated. Wentworth and Jones played in the 
number two doubles and Joe Levine teamed with 
Haskell in the third. Highlight of the year was 
the 5-4 victory over Army in the opening match of the season. 
The match was in doubt until Haskell and Levine finished their 
doubles game under impending darkness. The high standard of 
performance established at this time remained throughout the 
spring to plague all other opponents. 



TENNIS 




Standiiic! . . . Cratsky . . . Rorer . . 
coach, kneeling . . . Morrow 



Pratt . . . Asplundh . 
. . Walker . . . Meyer 



. Wilkison . . . Hoey 
. . Baker . . . Burbank. 



Stetson, 



The 1951-1950 Swarthmore golf season 
was one of the most dismal in recent 
years, the squad being able to manage 
only one win in eight tries. The loss of 
Chuck Reilly and Mike Remorenko, the 
inexperience of most of the new members 
and the inclement weather which cut 
practices to a minimum all had a large 
hand in keeping the Garnet from hitting 
the winning road. Nick Meyer, playing 
number one, and Bob Asplundh, number 
two, both showed a tremen- 
dous amount of improve- 
ment over last year but they 
chanced to meet opponents 
whose golf was far too 
steady and sharp. At vari- 
ous times during the season other mem- 
bers of the squad displayed brilliance in 
flashes and left the door open at the end 
of the year for hope that the coming 
season would show a great improvement. 



GOLF 




WOMEN'S SPORTS 



TENNIS 



Back row . . . Nichol . . . Holbrook . . . Nolde . . . Jones 

. . . Wehle . . . Speier . . . Hill . . . May Parry, coach, 

front row . . . Bushman . . . Meyer . . . Woford . . . Powell 

. . . Morrel . . . Hand . . . Evans. 




SPRING 



GOLF 



Harvey . . . Piper . . . Skillman 
. . . Reeves. 



SOFTBALL 



Back row . . . Dun . . . Rosenberry . . . 
Christensen ... A. Smith . . . Bradley 
. . . Sundgaard . . . Douglas . . . Dett- 
mers; front rouy . . . D'Emilio . . . Jones 
. . . Ore . . . Manson . . . Yost . . . Licht- 




ARCHERY 



Denslow . . . Culin . . . WoHe . . . Hall . . . Slinghoff . . . Barrera . . . Bunker . . . Dinny 

Rath, coach. 




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LACROSSE 




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Back row . . . Scutt . . . R. Maurer . . /Sicherman . . . S. Smith . . . ). Elliott . . . Bomar 

. . . S. Harvey . . . Eronini . . . Dinny Rath, coach, second row . . . Benson ... P. Taylor 

. . . Slaugh . . . Wheeler . . . Webster . . . Abernethy . . . Morey,- first row . . . Brock 

. . . Voysey . . . MacMillan . . . S. Smith . . . Hay . . . Mallonee. 




■*7?^- 



Ik 



PREXY . . . watched himself appear on the election stand in 
clothier . . . but definitely not a forgotten man . . . modified 
views in the opening collection address . . . then waited patiently 
all fall for the weekly surprises . . . twice daily trek to commons 
for a smoke and breath of atmosphere . . . coordinates the ele- 
ments within, faces the winds without, and maintains the calm 
. . . scholar with practical application . . . and time to be a family 
man too . . . dignity without aloofness ... a well known figure in 
and beyond swarthmore circles- ... his name found on many 
letter-heads . . . gives speeches that charm any kind of audience 
. . . and manages to convey the idea that this is all new . . . looks 
like member of the diplomatic corps with hat and briefcase . . . 



WHEN shall we four meet again? . . . gentle handling of prospectives . . . surprise 
them when they become freshmen by remembering more than each name and face 
. . . what do you mean, you don't have time to get enough sleep? . . . geographical 
distribution represented among them . . . from ante to post bellum . . . pleasant hosts in 
and out of office . . . smiling oblivion in collection . . . the inner light found in all 
students . . . defreeze the mechanics of administration by friendliness and charm. 

Dean Qilmore Stott. newest addition to the clan . . .' played his fiddle while gilbert 
and Sullivan burned . . . long chats with students in commons . . . people wonder who 
the new transfer student is . . . advocate of international exchange in education . . . vivid 
interest in student activities. 

Bean Everett Tlunt. enjoys yearly hegira to his western home . . . appears at the 
freshman picnic in ten gallon hat and bright shirt ... a calm manner and thoreau-like 
feeling for the outdoors, music . . . joins the faculty during second semester and shows 
his love of poetry . . . sympathetic to student problems and a generous giver of help 
and advice. 

Dedn Susan Cobbs. the arts and classics . . . widely admired as teacher, administrator, 
advisor, friend . . . can turn crises into adventures . . . finds the core of any problem 
immediately and handles it graciously and perceptively . . . warm and relaxed manner 
which makes being a dean seem like the most manageable job in the world. 

Dean Barbara Colbron. counseling, non-academic problems, committees . . . enjoys 
having students drop in for impromptu and informal talks . . . office door open and a 
friendly hi to all passers-by . . . has a wealth of material on job opportunities and is 
expanding the vocational guidance program . . ., wonderful sense of humor. 





administrative offices 



Tktured -. 

upper left: Sara HiUle, Xathryn Davisson, office 
of the house director. 

upper riciht: Tleinrich Brmfeman,- acting registrar, 
tower right: Edward Cratstey, Joseph Shane, vice- 
presidents of the college. 

loiver left: Charles Q. Jhatcher, business man- 
aper. 






W FACULTY 






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faculty 



HUMANITIES 



ELISA ASENSIO, Spanish . . . limitless good 
nature . . . vivacious latin twinkle . . . non, ce 
n'cst pas francnis ... I know you can do better 
. . . Spanish club "plugs" . . . es verdad . . . 
vamos a ver. 

LYDIA BAER, german . . . helpful to the nth 
degree . . . always smiling . . . expects the im- 
possible . . . you don't mind, do you . . . endless 
supply of quotes . . . swiss aesthete. 
MONROE BEARDSLEY, philosophy ... I may 
be small but I'm wiry . . . pixie grin, elfin voice 
. . . you've got a point, but I'd rather — . . . shy 
assertiveness . . . divine microcosm of beauty and 
logic. 

GEORGE BECKER, engUsh . . . profoundly well- 
adjusted . . . faculty committeeman . . . gnomic 
. . . logical reduction to clear aesthetic patterns 
. . . life on three levels . . . clarity of concepts 
carried to matching ties and socks. 
RICHARD BRANDT, philosophy ... if you ask 
a hopi . . . the last time I talked to russell about 
this . . . now mr. firth seems to think — ... I guess 
maybe we should consult the ideal observer. 
ALICE BRODHEAD, education . . . gracious liv- 
ing . . . hungry students well fed . . . nest over 
garage . . . seminar in elementary teaching cov- 
ers world affairs . . . wide interests . . . applied 
ideals. 

SUSAN COBBS, classics . . . two forms of greek 
pronunciation — north and south . . . amateur 
philologist . . . scintillating declensions . . . sur- 
prise, close your books please . . . miss cobbs and 
pallas athene. 

HILDE COHN, german . . . live wire with the 
short hair, low voice, and ready smile . . . full of 
wit and good humor . . . classes can be fun . . . 
sincere interest in individuals. 



pictured, top to bottom: 
Shero, Walker, 
Wolpe, Sorber, 
Firth, Theiss, 
Swan, Brandt, 
Klees. 









facutiy 



DAVID COWDEN, engUsh . . . horiTriiiimcd 
glasses . . . college cut coat . . . peering eyebrows 
. . . tolerant jowls over freshman grammar . . . 
commons coffee habit . . . Virginia woolf and 
bachelors do mix . . , symbols make the world go 
round. 

RODERICK FIRTH, philosophy . . . quiet, un- 
imposing manner . . . little boy's eyes and smile 
. . . ideal observer . . . student friend who refuses 
to give his age . . . opinions rare but frequently 
quoted. 

HELEN HALL, english . . . known by most 
foreign students as teacher, guide, friend . . . and 
indispensable interpreter of the anierican . . . 
globe trotter . . . ex-george school principal . . . 
soil expert . . . superb cook. 
PHILIP HICKS, emiUsh . . . bachelor look with 
loud sports shirts- and plaid ties . . . gleeful grin 
and gentle, yet profound wit . . . cosmopolitan, 
distinguished . . . subtly-organized teaching tech- 
nique culminating in olympian exam questions. 
SAM HYNES, eiiglish . . . satirist of life in gen- 
eral . . . anti-scientist by ignorance . . . wheels 
baby carriage with sneer and pipe . . . penn war- 
ren . . . enlivens english comp with novel assign- 
ments. 

FREDERIC KLEES, cnclUsh . . . anyone like to 
stick his neck out? . . . the Pennsylvania dutch 
. . . damsite; the name was not my idea ... so 
you see the traveling salesman joke originated 
clear back in the canterbury tales. 
OLGA LAMKERT, russian . . . beautiful white 
hair with cossack headress . . . tales of the old 
riissia . . . welcomes attempts at russian conversa- 
tion over Chinese tea and rye bread . . . never an 
exam without refreshments . . . great hopes for 
students . . . strictness tempered with grand- 
motherliness. 

HAROLD MARCH, jrench . . . your intention 
is irreproachable but your declension is not . . . 
books on proust, gide, etc . . . suffers with balzac 
in seminar and class . . . comfortable contortions 
with ash tray, cigarette holder, lamp, etc ... I 
am favorable, in fact, I incline a bit towards . . . 
but you can't explain this sort of thing. 



pictured, top to bolloni: 

Lamkert, Beardsley, 

Phillips, L. Wencelius, 

Cobbs, North, Hordern, 

March. 






I" 





facuhj 



HELEN NORTH, dassics . . . never too busy to 
chat or listen to a problem . . . stimulating teacher 
. . . sophrosyne . . . what do high schools teach in 
latin? . . . lucretius, dante, milton . . . the trans- 
lations are terrible. 

EDITH PHILIPS, french . . . solitary confine- 
ment on elm lane . . . but extensive literary 
contacts cfuand j'etais en rtissie . . . i.e. formal 
manner in class combined with precipices of in- 
formation. 

KARL RELINING, clenncin . . . language as seen 
from the other side of the tracks . . . luther 
molded expression: the need performed a miracle 
. . . civilization a complex whole . . . composed 
of curiosities . . . meaning as a road to under- 
standing. 

HEDLEY RHYS, fine arts . . . seminarb in com- 
mons and occasionally in a lodge . . . enlighten- 
ing and contagiously enthusiastic even at eight 
. . . dress designer for lovely model: his wife . . . 
at least you made an intelligent mistake. 
ERNA SCHNEIDER, philosophy . . . latest ad- 
dition to philosophy — from yale out of wellesley 
■ . . striking grey eyes are clear, infinite . . . 
shrewd and intelligent . . . always a reasonably 
positive positivist . . , charley. 
JOSEPH SHANE, educaiion . . . man with a 
ready smile . , . always an appropriate anecdote 
... to teach a well lit classroom is essential . . . 
list six criteria, seven cardinal principles and 
twenty- four basic skills, if you please. 
LLICILIS SHERO, classics . . . booming voice . . . 
pauses between words . . . well, that was a good 
guess, but — . . . patient about bad translations 
. . . president of the american philogical associ- 
ation . . . famed for acting ability. 
JAMES SORBER, Spanish . . . veritable alec 
guiness . . . delighted hamburg audiences with 
multi-linguistics and bartender, more cheese . 
open minded welcome of new ideas from Spanish 
one to seminar ... a marathon reader . . . but life 
is still more incredible than fiction. 



pichircd, top to boffom : 

Rhys, 

M. Wencelius, Schneider, 

Asensio, Hunt. 



faciilh 



ALFRED SWAN, music ... put another nickel 
in, make it palestrinian . . . infinite patience . . . 
this chord looks like the tower of bahel . . . but 
keep it if you really want it . . . sympathy for 
young rebels . . . the moderns are ingenious. 
JEANNE THEISS, french . . . roberts french hall 
big sister . . . chuckles and wrinkles up her nose 
. . . ce n'est pas tout (i fait <^a . . . merveiUeu-x! 
. . . enders' "jeannius" . . . cuisinicre par ex- 
cellence. 

ROBERT WALKER, fine arts . . . architecture 
and frank lloyd wright . . . struggles with sleepy 
eight o'clockers . . . the absent-minded professor 
. . . three charming daughters . . . sailing his 
sport . . . singularly genial. 
LEON WENCELIUS, french . . . ferocious ap- 
pearance dissolves into shy twinkle and dimple 
. . . cfui est assez amusante . . . thick french cof- 
fee .. . bumbling absently to himself in heavy 
alsatian . . . "st. ex.," calvin, rabelais. 
MARTHE WENCELIUS, french . . . first year 
students learn french by listening to her english 
. . . delightful blackboardside manner . . . always 
beaming . . . intense . . . divides time between 
poesie nioderne and fran^ois. 
STEPHEN WHICHER, english . . . amateur 
actor . . . baseball player . . . potter collection 
and Wednesdays on the radio . . . expert knowl- 
edge of subject expressed with the perfect phrase 
and quiet contagious enthusiasm. 
IRMA WOLPfi, music . . . concert pianist ex- 
tracting the best from bach, chopin, bartok . . . 
stresses the natural versus the traditional . . . 
zealous inquirer . . . forceful defender of rhe 
truth behind politics or the art of living ... in- 
ternational itinerary. 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT, english . . . omniscient 
. . . penetrating . . . complete comprehension of 
the aesthetic in any conceivable situation . . . 
all-pervasive, intellectual wit , . . eight-level house 
. . . nebulous family . . . now where did my 
sentence come from? 



pictured, top to hotloni , 

Brodhead, Cowden, 

Becker, Hynes, 

Hicks, Wright, Whicher, 

Reuning, Bacr, Cohn. 





faculty 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 



MARY ALBERTSON, hisfcry . . . originator of 
swarthmore school of whimsical history . . . 
growth of parliament from the sheep's point of 
view . . . charming, scholarly person . . . with a 
knack for misplacing exams. 
PAUL BEIK, history . . . shyly dehonair . . . 
constant source of cheerful advice . . . tennis 
enthusiast . . . better half in the libe . . . every- 
thing relates to the french revolution — and dra- 
matically! . . . pipe and chuckle. 
JOHN CHAPMAN, political science . . . "don't 
you people get it — you just cannot do that kind 
of thing" . . . freshmen girl giggles . . . prepara- 
tion for smith . . . class of '43 . . . carried on 
quaker match-box tradition . . . POSDCORB. 
JOSEPH CONARD, economics . . . patience of 
a pilgrim . . . smile of a saint . . . "well, at ca" 
. . . multiple equilibrium tic tac toe . . . "of course 
1 don't really know but I should think that. . . ." 
JAMES FIELD, bistory ... in training for the 
man of distinction ad . . . that harvard look . . . 
but what is that man doing back in Cambridge 
again? . . . who pushed rome? 
HERBERT ERASER, economics . . . "you sir" 
. . . extremely good-natured . . . experiences in 
germany ... "I know a fellow" . . . well-ac- 
quainted with england, especially lloyds of london 
. . . "this is an interesting problem." 
PHILIP JACOB, poUticai science ... a real gift 
from penn . . . with him polisci two becomes not 
only bearable but oh that rendition of hitler . . . 
reveals his position through satiric witisicisms 
. . . dynamism and interest permeate courses and 
seminars alike. 

LAURE.MCE LAEORE, history . . . extremely 
civilized . . . fascinating house . . . modern europe 
and diplomacy . . . extending talents to magazine 
writing . . . majestic walk, elegant wit, cultured 
speech . . . sympathy and tact . . . master of long, 
involved, coherent sentence . . . "as you will 
immediately perceive." 



pictured, top to bottom: 
Beik, Lafore, 

Albertson, Eraser, Michaels, 
Weatherford, Wilcox. 



faculiy 



GERALD MANGONE, poUtkal science . . . 
french beret, brief case, and long legged walk 
. . . dynamics in politics and lectures . . . hair in 
face . . . comparison of continents and women 
. . . some of you passed. 

ROLAND PENNOCK, poUtical science ... the 
judicial mind . . . examines all things from all 
angles . . . footnotes can be interesting . . . reigns 
over realm of political theory . . . dry humor with 
a warm smile. 

FRANK PIERSON, econoiiiic; . . . genial cow- 
boy with that denver drawl . . . lets you down 
easily ... I would argue . . . frankie and iohnny 
are playmates . . . my wife could handle this 
easily. 

NEVIN SCHALL, economics . . . smiles from 
university of penn . . . visitor for a semester . . . 
working for ph.d. . . . enjoys poli theory . . . 
swarthmore; darn good school . . . famous last 
words: whitlesby says. 

MURRAY STEDMAN, political science . . . 
those good old army days . . . cynical . . . deni- 
zen of commons . . . what we need is a strong 
two-party system . . . dry biting humor belies a 
congenial and understanding nature. 
JOHN TEALL, history ... not quite to be taken 
for a student . . . searches for the swarthmore 
type and the swarthmore attitude . . . intends to 
fit them and is well qualified for it. 
WILLIS WEATHERFORD, economics . . . gen- 
tle with a juleped accent ... an economist who 
climbs the highest slopes, skiis down snowiest 
hills and works in a friendly way far and near. 
RLISH WELTER, bisfory . . . young . . . blond 
. . . reveals his university background in speech 
and action . . . the green book bag . . . already 
famous for his c.xams ... is this really the issue? 



pictured, top to bottom: 

Ylvisaker, Mangonc, 

Pennock, Welter, 

Teall, Field, 

Pierson, Stedman, Chapman. 





faculty 



CLAIR WILCOX, economics . . . originator of 
humor in the wilcoxian tradition . . . voice like 
the lion's roar . . . when the big boys get to- 
gether down at the union league . . . what if 
there weren't really any gold in fort knox? 
PAUL YLVISAKER, poUiical science . . . junior 
year abroad (courtesy of fulbright act) . . , turns 
stedman's cynics back to starry-eyed hopefuls . . . 
takes classes to Chester (to study government, of 
course!). 



NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 



SOLOMON ASCH, psychology ... an indi- 
vidual in our society . . . known for his rapid-fire 
delivery . . . but can a rat e.\press irony? . . . 
directs enormous research projects from olympian 
heights above parrish maids' quarters. 
DENNISON BANCROFT, physics . . . how 
long is a meter-stick? . . . trial by jury, ruddi- 
gore, hamburg show, chorus . . . the squirrel and 
his three nuts . . . another yankee . . . holy ter- 
ror of swarthmore pedestrians. 
KURT BOHNSACK, biohgy . . . perpetual 
freshman, still disoriented . . . proud father of 
leeda . . . entomologist, specializing in straining 
soil . . . know of any men who'd like to take field 
zoo? ... oh my. 

HEINRICH BRINKMANN, nmihemalics . . . 
another professor with an ancient dog . . . horn- 
rimmed glasses . . . wiry hair ... a great teacher 
. . . even the inherently difficult becomes clear in 
his words. 

PHILIP CARRUTH, mcifhematics . . . swarth- 
more's contribution to reed college . . . tennis pro 
par excellence . . . often seen playing with j.ohn 
n. and p. beik ... I don't think that's quite 
rigorous. 

EDWARD COX, chemistry . . . what fool pre- 
med did that? . . . brusque and gruff to hide heart 
of steel . . . all-round good guy . . . paints country 
landscapes . . . tennis enthusiast . . . write it out. 



picliired, top to bottom: 
Meinkoth, 
Marriot, Schall, 
Gleitman, Creedon, 
Jacob, Carruth, 
Connard. 



facully 



CAROL CREEDON, psychohtty ... a pleasure 
to see in any classroom . . . establishes permissive 
teaching atmosphere . . . advocates equal rights 
for social psychologists . . . wonderful to talk 
with, about anything. 

JERMAIN CREIGHTON, chemisiry . . . dean 
and former chairman of chemistry . . . atomic 
bomb project . . . chemistry two . . . inspiring 
and human . . . covers ground in lecture, back 
and forth, back and forth . . . wealth of experi- 
ence. 

RICHARD CRUTCHFIELD, psychohcjy . . . 
the canvas shoes and the battered hat . . . some- 
thing always seems about to happen . . . elfin 
expression and charming manner convert scores 



to psych . . . unbelievably neat desk ... ef- 
ficiency plus. 

ARNOLD DRESDEN, nmthenmiics . . . santa 
claus . . . fondness and understanding for his 
students . . . "it's terribly simple" . . . "that 
should be written on the ceiling in gold letters" 
. . . monday evening open house for chamber 
music enthusiasts. 

ROBERT E-NDERS, -cohcjy . . . man with more 
children than students . . . always has definite 
views on pseudo-science . . . wood cutting . . . 
india . . . and' where to get apple cider ... a man 
known to everyone and few . . . the boss. 
LUZERNE LIVINGSTON, botany . . . corny 
jokes for every occasion . . . flashy ties and quiet 
ways . . . desperate puttering old car . . . always 
a sympathetic ear and kind word, and a new rube 
goldberg experiment. 

EDWARD FEHNEL, chemistry . . . chemist, 
through and through . . . many honors and de- 
grees . . . wife and two children . . . organic and 
advanced inorganic . . . aloof manner but known 
to freshmen as manufacturer of olfactory sur- 
prises. 



pictured, top to bottom. 

Livingston, Scott, Enders, 

Flemister, L. Flemister, Bohnsack, 

Prentice, Pitman, 

Dresden, Van de Kamp. 





faculty 



THE FLEMISTERS, biohcty ... the doctors 
flemister . . . scientific enthusiasm personified . . . 
still students . . . experts on water balance in 
crabs . . . her famous last words: no, I only want 
to be a lecturer ... his: hands very steady for 
only one and one half packs a day ... so genu- 
ine and well-appreciated. 

DUNCAN FOSTER, chemislry . . . new eng- 
land humor with southern softening . . . both sons 
swarthmore graduates . . . unidentifiable precipi- 
tate is only colloidal sulphur . . . manganese rain- 
bow . . . the sabbatical postprandial response. 
MILAN GARRETT, physics . . . meticulous 
analyst . . . taking a year out for research ... 
now where did we lose that decimal point? , . . 
hard on freshmen ... by the beauty of the in- 
tegral calculus. 

HENRY GLEITMAN, psychology . . . theah we 
werrre . . . sniff, sniff . . . rats are nice . . . 
chess in commons .'. . tho' vocal the organism 
may be thinking . . . leipzig-paris-c.c.n.y. accent 
. . . latent talents. 

WALTER KEIGHTON, chemistry . . . patient 
martyr of chem one . . . will always explain 
again . . . three jokes a semester . . . huge 
family . . . his wife's baking a delight to chem 
majors. 

WOLFGANG KOHLER, psychohciy ... oc- 
casional campus visitor . . . research professor of 
philosophy, psychology, and tonsure . . . has sent 
scores to the electric chair ... his seminars a 
unique experience . . . after-effects not always 
easy to figure. 

PETER MADISON, psychology ... now freud 
would say . . . clinical psychologist with harvard 
background . . . local practitioner of the pro- 
jective test . . . I'll have to get home; my wife is 
waiting for me. 



pictured, top to bottom: 

Brinkmann, Eliot, 

Cox, Fehnel, 

Keighton, Slowinski, 

Madison, Crutchfield, Asch. 



facuUy 



ROSS MARRIOTT, mathcmatks . . . jumping 
jack in classes . . . never enough board space . . . 
no tests, knows his students well enough without 
them . . . sarcasm supreme, but spares the girls. 
NORMAN MEINKOTH, hiohcly ... the bugs 
have got him . . . camera and parasite, of course 
. . . patience personified . . . red hair but slow 
temper . . . longest tests in history of science . . . 
personality laugh. 

JOHN PITMAN, astronomy . . . colored chalk 
to brighten eight o'clock classes ... 1 say, he 
says . . . church on Sunday mornings, shaking 
hands . . . glasses, mustache, dimple in his chin 
. . . conservative manner. 

WILLIAM PRE.NJTICE, psychology . . . epitome 
of analytic reasoning ... an encyclopedic mind 
. . . lawn well-kept by his own labor . . . old 
shirts and wood-chopping, after hours . . . dirty 
brown-and- whites. 

WALTER SCOTT, biology . . . martin smoke- 
stack . . . own taxononiic scheme — footie for girls 
and egg for men . . . has comfortable chair for 
uncomfortable biologists . . . white lab coat or 
plaid shirts. 

EMIL SLOWINSKI, chemistry . . . mathema- 
tician of chem department . . . bicycle and trips 
to field house to keep in shape . . . emil and emily 
. . . mrs. cooks for seminars . . . she recently 
graduated from . . . recorder music from phiz- 
chem vies with fumes from organic. 
PETER VAN DE KAMP, astronomy . . . scien- 
tist-musician . . . local legend says he chose 
swarthmore over harvard because he couldn't 
conduct the orchestra there . . . lectures and 
studies in europe . . . astronomical reputation 
among astronomers. 

HANS WALLACH, psychology . . . avid per- 
ceptionist . . . bright students — darling . . . what 
beautiful data you have, miss miller . . . ponder- 
ous silence, then aha! insight . . . that's a mar- 
velous idea; I thought of it in '43. 
WINTHROP WRIGHT, physics . . . sage of 
the physics department . . . always willing to 
talk things over . . . socratic method 
petual pipe . . . but on the other hand. 



per- 



liiclurcd, top lo bollom ■ 
Garett, Kohler, 
Wright, Bancroft, 
Creighton, Wallach, 
Elmore, Foster. 





facuhj 



ENGINEERING 

SAMUEL CARPENTER, civil engineering . . . 
should be in the red pencil business . . . advocate 
of tv education . . . "don't you know it costs 
four dollars an hour to sleep in my class?" 
JUSTUS GARRAHAN, electrical engineering 
. . . hollywood haircut . . . cap and gown behind 
the door . . . broadleaf's best friend . . . rotund 
joviality . . . give them back next time, maybe . . . 
the math department wouldn't approve of this. 
ROY LINSENMEYER, civil engineering . . . 
voice with a smile . . . quiet manner combined 
with determination gets things across . . . mighty 
man of c.e., breaks steel plate, into pieces with 
his bare — 600000 lb. testing machine. 
ROBERT .MERRIA.M, electrical engineering . . . 
good morning fellows, . . . any other questions 
on this subject . . . five minute quizzes ... it 
starts back in dr. fussels lab . . . diagrams with 
thousands of colors . . . the human voltmeter. 
BERN.'VRD MORRILL, mechanical engineering 
. . . ms at mit . . . mms at delaware . . . authentic 
boston accent . . . practical man in the m.e. 
department . . . the book did it that way, you'll 
do it this way , . . gears, pulleys, chains . . . and 
clutches . . . three pages ahead of the class . . . 
it's been a long time since I studied it . . . this is 
a short assignment. 

CHARLES NEWLIN, civil engineering . . . rose 
polytech, corps of engineers, harvard . . . home 
in Indiana . . . c.e. soils man . . . yoimg son 
sleeps through baby-sitters . . . darnedest thing 
you ever saw. 

PHILIP PRAGER, mechanical engineering . . . 
always a good practical man and rapidly becom- 
ing a very fine preacher . . . absorbed in subtle 
humor and Wilmington ties . . . likes the work, the 
ho;.irs, and the students at times . . . the casual 
engineer. 

WILLIAM REASER, mechanical engineering . . . 
when I was at (a) lafayette, (b) bailey meter, 
(c) atlantic city, etc . . . laugh, or else . . . puritan 
. . . baseball fanatic . . . when I caught for . . . if 
you will . . . may I inject . . . the m.e. menace. 
MERTON WILLIS, cipil engineering . . . texan 
.... experience ranges from panama canal to 
alcutians . . . when it isn't starboard tack, it's flaps 
down ... of course, there's a quiz tomorrow, fellas. 



pictured, top to bottom -. 

Reaser, Jenkins, 

.Morrill, McCrumm, Merrian, Garrahan, 

Willis, Newlin, Linsenmeyer, Carpenter, 

Prager. 



\m 



HM W P# 



\ 



STUDENTS 



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upper photociraph: between the pillars , Cox: back row, 
lejt to rights Alward . . . Henefer . '. . Schmitz . . . Kyle 



. . . Kaniman . . 
fourth row, Brusca 
third row, Cliffe . 
. . . Fernandez . . 
Buel . . . Powell . . 



Sniucker . 
. . Winkler 
. Miller . . 



Lewis . . . Hummer: 
, Brosius . _. Swartout: 
Thompson . . . Hand 



CLASS OF 1952 



Seaman: second row, Nehrling . . . 
Detwiler . . . Grinnell . . . Blatchford: 

first row, Cole . , . Maurice . . , Lyman . . . Daugherty . . . 

Ames . . . Foulger . , . Ellenbogan. 

Lower photograph : last row, Snyder . . . Price . . . Hill . . . 

Green . . . Hall . . . Obermayer: third row, Paxson . . . 
Mooers . . , Tomlinson . . . Brown . . . 
Burn . . . Watertield: second row, De 
Kiewiet . . . Crawford . . . Mawson . . . 
Waddington . . . Pearson . . . Ridge: 
first row, Boden . . . Wheeler . . . Lee 
. . . Morrell . . . Smith . . . Munro. 



CLASS OF 1952 




CLASS OF 1953 




GEORGE GILKEY ABEL, III, 2it. Aiverno, Venna. Slight, light, and unique ... one of the 
swarthmore high fellows . . . quaker ancestry . . . rather quiet about campus . . . mild mannered 
. . . sublety of wit . . . occasional sparks of diplomatic genius . . . licensed real estate salesman . . . 
constantly accompanied by briar pipe . . . ardent advocate of free enterprise . . . mixes economics 
with philosophy and literature . . . accumulator of strange and peculiar bits of knowledge . . . 
economics. ^ y DANIEL K. Y. AI, Thanking, China. Architecture, geology and history in China, 
switched to m.e. but claims to be a thwarted mathematician . . . detailed knowledge of modern^ 
eastern politics . . . stoical acceptance of reality . . . methodical neatness . . . plays tennis with an 
armory of warped rackets . . . ambition to be a photographer confined to reading photo magazines 
. . . cheerfully eats handfuls of pepper each meal ... tea and chopsticks in the evening . . . 
Dan . . . mechanical engineering, y ^ JUDITH CREIGHTON ALBRECHT, Springfield, 
Venna. Unbelievably fantastic summers . . . it's either the guitar or the camera . . . confuses four 
kinds of Spanish and now makes a real pot-pourri with french . . . half baked zoologist with 
frustrated humanities ambitions . . . unpredictable and absentmindedly esoteric . . . music, weird 
starvation diets, a flair for the literary . . . frogs, earthworms, and fish notwithstanding . . . 
square-dancing isn't wasted time, it's relaxation . . . apparent detachment hides infinite warmth 
and feeling for people . . . judy . . . zoology, y -f ELIZABETH ALDEN, Brookline, Mass. 
Constant conflict between bostonian upbringing and social conscience . . . hypercritical of herself 
and of others . . . yet a pressing interest in people . . . long nightly walks to resolve resulting- 
confusion . . . insanities: pink laundry and belabored budgets . . . first loves: maine, medieval 
england, laboring classes, beautiful language, a ghastly red sweater . . . old boxes and last year's 
newspaper painstakingly preserved . . . seeks cooperative, socially significant, intellectually 
stimulating future ... but where? . . . betsy . . . biology, y y IRENE MARIE ALFKE, 
Brooklyn, SVeu' 3'ork. Always on the go but never quite gets there . . . habitual letter writer . . . 
chorus . . . g and s . . . friday afternoon concerts . . . sympathetic interest 
in others . . . gwimp . . . water ballet, she manages to get out of swimming 
. . . lazy summers at the lake . . . sailing . . . thoughtful, sincere, and fun to 
be with ... a peter pan . . . economics, y y PHILIP MARK ALLEN, 
Lansdowne, Venna. The dean acheson of the red arrow bus line . . . loves to 
look wise . . . camouflaged inner conflicts . . . decorum is everything . . . 
comes to swarthmore, but not often . . . firm advocate of aristocracy when it 
includes the new yorker, i. w. harper, faulkner, lawrence, jaunts to runyon- 
land . . . I'll know . . . peripheral fraternity man ... the devious road to 
zion . . . english. y y RONALD ALTMAN, Brooklyn, T^ew Jork. One of 
the Midwood Mighty Minds . . . erstwhile economist . . . now incipient medic 
. . . did you hear what enders said today? feline jaw-bone in desk . . . what's 
wrong with baseball? . . . sn recordings . . . sda . . . one of the memorable 
foursome sophomore year . . . planted cat . . . laughed helplessly at the 
ensuing battle . . . strongly addicted to humor in the Wilcoxian tradition . . 
zoology honors, y y JOHN R. AMBRUSTER, JR., Qreendale, IVisconsin. 
C section's gift to the dean's office . . . misogynist, misanthrope . . . le plus miserable des 
hommes . . . explorer of the wild west in a model a . . . the schlitz brewery, the setam tunnel also 
explored . . . blue skies, asthmatic giggles, nicotined fingers, construction company forearms . . . 
look, max! . . . don't get wise wit me wit yas french ... I tellya, honors is killing me . . . history 
honors, y y FRANCIS T. ASHTON, Washington, D.C. Thought he'd be an engineer, soon 
became converted to bio by way of physics . . . haphazard genius . . . not a mere device . . . sits 
for hours contemplating? . . .discoverable through what he does . . . built harpsichord because 
they said he couldn't do it . . . then became baroque musical eclectic . . . likely to hear seals 
bark . . . tinkers, also tailors . . . first russian ballet period . . . odd for odd's sake . . . and then 
it's time for tea . . . biology, y y ETHAN FRANK BALL, JR., Bethlehem, Venna. The smile 
under the horn rims . . . the engineer's outlook: who's milton? ... I like my Saturday night 
movies . . . freshman year with' the class of 1952 . . . unperturbed by academic rigors except 
over typewriter at one a.m. . . . electrical interests extend to the latest in radio designing . . . 
still looking for his plug in life,- may not find it until after master's degree . . . electrical engineer- 
ing, y y MARY BARTLETT, Rockford, 111. Our far westerner from Chicago ... ingratiating 
giggle anjd common sense . . . missed honors on purpose . . . future fireman with experience as 
fire corporal in parrish and palmer ... a good listener . . . gwimpster . . . news bureau deadlines 
. . . oh, pew! . . . waits patiently through ruddigore for pinafore . . . dear parents, I've lost my 
watch again . . . this is the last band! ... the palmer back apartment . . . history, y y ARTHLIR 
JOHANNES BEACH, It'ashington, B.C. Don't work too hard . . . never does himself unless 
absolutely necessary . . . fast walker, late hours, reserved at first meeting — but . . . stage crew, 
social committee . . . loves, labs,' and two student seminars . . . criminal arthur beach . . . had to 
take intro bio to see a few women . . . chemistry. 



class oj 1953 




JENNIFER BELL, T^ew 3'ork, T^ew 3'ork. I can resist everything but temptation itself . . . 
those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril ... if I ever get married I'll certainly try 
to forget the fact . . . one must be serious about something if one wants to have any amusement 
in life ... so many people go about society pretending to be good that I think it shows 
a sweet and modest disposition to pretend to be bad . . . the rest is silence . . . bi'sfory honors. 
y Y DEANE BELLOW, ll'ashington, D.C. Striking beauty in small print . . . anyone seen my 
English translation of la peste? . . . intermittent efficiency . . . I'art poitr I'art, also scrapbooks 
of furnishings ... I do not laugh all the time . . . children are nicer than people . . . pleasantly 
opinionated ... a New Yorker look, mental and sartorial . . . formidable in war, warm in 
peace . . . english. / y ELSA LAURA BENNETT, Hurlington, Vermont. Now you're given a 
polynomial of degree n ... six other flutes were there too . . . it's really just as easy to get into 
the math libe from the fire escape . . . Sunday afternoon expeditions through the steam tunnel . . . 
pooh . . . tomorrow I'll be up to last week's assignment . . . a's and b's with ease . . . one of 
the sincerest people we know . . . mathematics, y y FRANCES SIDWELL BENSON, 
"Baltimore, Maryland. Crazy about cats, cars, and candy . . . foves city life . . . relaxed studying 
. . . louis armstrong (mr. jazz), king oliver, Sidney bechet — they're the greatest . . . badminton, 
lacrosse, circulation manager of phoenix . . . still a tom-boy . . . enthusiastic about, baltimore 
ball clubs and leo durocher . . . french, german, Spanish, russian; any 
more? . . . seems carefree . . . jrench. y y AVERY BLAKE, Swarthmore, 
Penna. Tough but oh so gentle . . . week-night gob . . . bunny b . . . 
penn party boy . . . what would father say? . . . swarthmore's answer 
to the seven blocks of granite . . . evidence of how high it can be stacked 
. . . phi psi hoopster . . . margie? ahhh . . . station wagons sure are 
handy . . . lacrosse all-american ... big chief of spring injuns . . . like 
father, like son . . . reaser's pet . . . eat a bird . . . bunky . . . mechanical 
engineering, y y MARK ALLEN BRUBAKER, Jiarrishurg, Venna. Life 
is a horrible joke ... yet living is an art . . . with wine, women, and 
Viennese operetta . . . unimpressed by intellectuals . . . and esthetes . . . 
love for medieval history, england . . . janeite . . . opera fiend . . . passion 
for incense, pagan rites . . . commuted between west indies and alaska in 
air force . . . strict regime over cutting collection treasures . . . violent 
aversion to student political organizations ... all subjects are but a 
branch of history . . . political science honors, y y CAROL ANN 
BRUNNER, Scotch Plains, T^ew Jersey. Always a friendly smile . . . 
full of energy . . . endless series of troubles with men ... bio is sooooo 
interesting, but how did I get in english? . . . scf secretary-treasurer (but helga does the 
bookkeeping) . . . pretty good with the bow and arrow . . . mrs. flemister's bottle washer . . . 
I like all movies, good and bad . . . future indefinite, but success insured for this young miss . . . 
english.- y y WILLIAM WHEELWRIGHT BUCKLEY, Cranjord. 'Mew Jersey: William lump- 
lump of freshman year; handsome phi delt . . . exuberance displayed in conversation par 
excellance . . . I've given up bridge, but maybe one hand . . '. versatility and varied interests-ltc, 
social committee, dodo, phinx, parties . . . would-be politician ... a smile for everyone and 
infectious good humor . . . occasional diplomatic blunders . . . idealistic . . . facility for running 
into swarthmorites in foreign states . . . cigarettes, anyone? . . . well-dressed . . . political science. 
y y JOHN^J. BURKS, Secane, Penna. Incredible imagination . . . refreshing sense of humor 
. . . genuine and thoughtful . . . never lost for an opinion or an idea . . . avid reader of any 
unrequired material . . . creatively expressive from the Charleston to the organ . . . but I'm not 
bored with sex . . . hilarious and exhausting week-ends sponsored by an atlantic credit card . . . 
neurotic is a word that means everybody ... oh, well . . . self-winding . . . psychology honors. 
y y PHOEBE BURNETT, Lake Zurich, W. Gal from chicawgo with curly hair and curly eye- 
brows . . . shy smile and warm friendliness . . . keen scientific mind . . . german major by 
choice . . . misplaced sigma xi . . . studies at night and sleeps in somerville . . . healthy appetite 
. . . steps on children . . . staunch palmerite . . . those lafayette men ... if we only had a 
two-month vacation right now . . . unselfish as they come . . . invaluable friend . . . foaniin' 
feebe . . . german. y y BARBARA CALKINS, Rochester, T^ew Jork. Music enthusiast . . . 
hamburg show ... I don't see why not . . . pink clouds . . . sleeping again or still as the case 
may be . . . grand old fraternity, phi delta theta for aye . . . who me? nooooo . . . upstate 
new york accent . . . friend of the whistler . . . two years on french hall . . . pet peeve: noises 
the figligie . . . hal . . . let's get this place clean . . . redhead . . . history, y y JOHN 
NORMAN CALVIN, Shaker Jleights, Ohio. It all goes back to the summer of '82 . . . mobile 
face . . . persecuted engineer . . . part-time draftsman . . . became soc vice-president after 
running out of ink . . . why, shore ... phi delt . . . cocoa in ml . . . tired tired bicycle 
. . . schloppily pours milk . . . pre-zactly . . . chalk ballistics and paper airplanes aid in designing 
rocket to moon ... it just so happens that . . . favorite colors gold and blue . . . mechanical 
engineering. 



^- K 




class oj 1953 



broken resolutions 
came to dinner . . 




JOE CARROLL, Xnightstown, 3nd. The westtown renegade . . . born basketball player . . . 
soccer, golf, skirts . . . well, I don't know what to tell you; then proceeds to . . . ping-pong, 
bridge, and other commons sports . . . once-a-week sailor . . . phi psi conduct committee . . . 
ah, shoot . . . always late . . . border line student . . . rather play basketball than eat or study 
. . . hoosier hick . . . civit engineering, y y ANN CHANTLER, Charlestown, W. Va. Soft 
you-all drawl with eyes to match . . . cigarettes and formaldehyde in Martin labs . . . sleeper 
par excellance . . . emerges from disheveled room looking beautiful . . . sophisticated bridge 
almost anywhere . . . gets silly between two and four a.m. . . . innumerable intricacies plus 
. . dr. michael's star pupil . . . horses, horses everywhere . . . the girl who 
it's all futile . . . everybody loves our chan . . . fine arts, y y DAVID FISKE, 
San Trancisco, California . . . political science, y y ELEANOR COHN, Rhinebeck, ?^ew Jork. 
Pre-med interested in getting into med school . . . frequents smoker and martin libe . . . always 
manages to hunt up a conversation . . . corduroy slacks, plaid shirts, comp. anat, home-made cakes 
and cookies . . . honors suits her to a t ... oh, what an impossible topic for a paper . . . does 
her sleeping in the libe . . . ellie . . . zoology honors. 

y y SHEILA ANN COHN, Jiewktt, T^ew Jork. Beneath the calm 
poise there lurks a sentimentalist . . . logically seductive and the converse 
too . . . transformation into an intellectual at intervals . . . toujours chic 
. . . music and art: wonderful but frustrating . . . wants to create 
something, anything . . . hidden talents revealed in hamburg show . . . 
versatile interests and abilities ... I don't belong at swarthmore,- I like 
people without analyzing them . . . new yorker, but sees beyond the 
traffic . . . shelly . . . political science honors, y y EUGENE COMMINS, 
Princeton, 'New Jersey. Precise humor . . . corrosive stare . . . nostalgic 
for automotive junk . . . sweet pea, injun joe, and that plymouth . . . 
main bearings sound like busting bottles . . . franny is all right . . . my 
ma and pa are grand . . . dusty trips west with pa and the boys, summers 
in the high voltage . . . lead in bancroft's barbershop . . . absorbed in 
his work: isn't this an elegant proof . . . what a sly seminar . . . e. david 
. . . mathematics honors, y y DORIS COOPERSON, Camden. New 
Jt'/ity. I'ruluund, penetrating, and incoherent . . . from norristown to mexico with the friend's 
service ... an english major leaning towards psychology . . . sparkling, vulnerable, uncynical, 
wise . . , infinitely altruistic . . . unusually sensitive to music and people . . . does anyone want 
anything . . . child-like beauty . . . dorie . . . etjglish honors, y y RUTH McCOY CROWLEY, 
7aUnouth, Tiiass. Long live the army . . . haunts the postoffice . . . let's eat at the druggie . . . 
pretends to study . . . completely impractical . . . art . . . beaming happily since acquiring a 
certain gold ring . . . dixieland fiend . . . hates writing papers . . . confirmed preps dweller . . . 
I forgot . . . quiet, but very nice . . . sensitive and sympathetic listener to your problems . . . 
tried to lose georgia accent but didn't succeed . . . red, scottie . . . english. y y DOMINIC 
CUSANO, Philadelphia, Penna. Although guided by the star of bethlehem, he's one of swarth- 
more's bigger attractions . . . friendly and unassuming until he goes wild for the garnet on the 
gridiron and diamond ... as modest about all that as his latest scholastic achievement . . 
reassures everyone with a giant grin and hello . . . likes people, their troubles and laughter . . 
could be called st. dominie, but ask lucy . . . he's nick . . . economics, y y LEWIS M, 
DABNEY III, New york. New york. Latest and most effusive of 21 generations of dabneys . . 
poker at midnight, showers at dawn, fitzgerald at 3 am, poetry at all times, in all things . . 
tirades on pseudoisms ... is lew a reactionary . . . disillusioned but not discouraged, for some 
fine morning . . . big guy with a bigger heart . . . english honors, y y ROBERT FRANKLIN 
DAVIDSON, JR., Qainesville, Tlorida. Who would like to spend christmas in florida — have 
you got a car? . . . formal verbosity and informal clothing . . . extravagant and rhythmic sleeping 
and dancing . . . only honors student who consistently breakfasts at seven thirty . . . the trouble 
with my roommates is invariably me . . . erratic ... 1 lost my social conscience when I was a 
freshman . . . only reasonably unpredictable . . . english honors, y y HERBERT CLARK 
DEAN, Qlencoe, Illinois. Well known for his genial smile and friendly manner . . . engineer 
by late choice . . . soccer manager and jayvee lacrosse . . . big noise from winnetka: not big, not 
noisy . . . coming hearts player . . . commons commando . . . phi psi . . . cd . . . golden tenor 
and personality to match . . . civil engineering. 





^^><;*;j*'!^'^, 





/ 










V 




/« 





class oj 1953 




EDWARD A. DILCHUS, PhUadetphia, Penna. An unending quest for understanding . . . social 
philosopher . . . disciple of mumford . . . worshiper of michelangelo . . . violent critic of the 
intellectual presumptuousness, vacuous verbiage . . . despises affectation . . . unimpressed by 
intellectuals, horn rimmed glasses, dirty clothes, main line english accents . . . cook, hotel clerk, 
time study engineer, etc. . . . epitomizes kappa sigma individualism . . . casual ed. . . . fine arts, y y 
GEORGE BLETHEN DOANE, III, Quakertown, Venna. Bachelor engineer in a dapper t-shirt 
. . . fresh-from-the-barber look . . . football on the quad . . . sports section every evening . . . 
a Ivio year bearcat ... in e.e. because it intrigued him . . . I'll take a bull course one of these 
days . . . summer sailing jaunts on the atlantic ... a letter to the editor when provoked . . . 
ethan and chester . . . sleeps now and then . . . george . . . electrical engineering, y y 
ELEANOR DODGE, Chevy Chase, Maryland. Lives in martin when not at the ender's . . . 
windswept child of the maine coast line . . . hamsters and mice as roommates . . . passion for 
sailing . . . look at my chlamydamonus . . . how's gretchen? . . . mischievous brown eyes to 
match hair . . . leaden girl . . . remembers just matters of consequence . . . including humphrey 
. . . the new improved dodge . . . j.v. diving . . . idealist with penchant for gandhi ... el, not 
ellie . . . zoology, y y DOROTHY BELLE DODSON, Madison, 5Vew Jersey. Small-town 
■ girl . . . loves new england, especially Vermont . . . well-informed, scien- 
tific minded . . . fancy knitter, a real pro . . . gwimp badminton manager 
. . . gobs of jewelry, silversmith for brother . . . two years finx circulation 
staff . . . not athletic, but went bowling once ... no night owl . . . 
bach, beethoven, but not brahms . . . enthusiastic, easily excited . . . belle, 
dottie belle, or d.b. . . . mathematics, y y GAIL EATON, Cleveland, 
Ohio. Transferred from Stevens college to swarthmore . . . nebraskan room- 
mate both times . . . quiet and subtle sense of humor . . . casual and 
beautiful dresser . . . it's a long walk from roberts to the dining room . . . 
reads magazines, novels, anything in the room before exams . . . under- 
stands other people and can laugh at herself . . . never seems to work 
but gets things done . . . psychology, y y MARY LOIS ECKLER, 
ll'ashington, B.C. Mary Lo . . . a convert to zoology . . . likes long talks, 
long walks, and things of a slightly outlandish nature . . . parrish rain 
gutters and underground passages a specialty . . . listens to everybody's 
joys and sorrows, still works hard, often between 12 and 4 a.m. . . . 
ecklerisms galore: feel free . . . let's not be indelicate about this . . . 60% 
are abnormal . . . saint george . . . zoology, y y HUGH CRICHTON 
EDSALL, SVorf/j Carolina. Canterbury club president . . . always second into the dining room 
. . . society of kwink . . . football manager ... is you crazy? . . . neat dresser . . . beethoven's 
fifth piano concerto . . . still likes hudsons . . . major: philosophy spelled with a k . . . hugh, 
can episcopal ministers get married? . . . philosophy, y y MARGARET KATHERINE 
EDSALL, Washington, D.C. Civil liberties union . . . loyal canterbury club member . . . always 
first into the dining room . . . looks like a lady, but watch her at football games . . . well, I've 
cleaned up my half of the room . . . has a weak spot for animals . . . sings with great enthusiasm' 
. . . must study sometime . . . once an edsall always an edsall . . . kay . . . fine arts, y y 
MARY ELLIOT, Sborf "Hills, T^ew Jersey. What a kick . . . wakes up smiling . . . lovely voice 
. . . sensitive . . . Stanford transfer . . . sings ra-ra songs by herself before football games . . . 
lots of brothers at princeton . . . saucy but serious . . . adaptable but autonomous . . . roommates 
gain on her food . . . snap judgements usually right . . . loves to walk and talk . . . fine arts. 
y y MARGARET DEANE EMRICH, Long Uranch, SVeic Jersey. Wit a la charles adams . . . 
sabotaged beds ... all night studying sprees . . .,niy land! ... oh, I approve . . . hail 
Columbia! . . . tiens!. . . . roommates tortured by Stravinsky, khatchaturian, et al . . . experi- 
mental cook ... up and down magill to roberts, panting up to fourth east after the trek . . . 
ardent bread and honey fan chez les Wencelius . . . struggles with french in Spanish class, and 
russian everywhere . . . margie . . . french. y y NANCY ELIZABETH ERB, Qarden City, 
T^ew york. Nancy with the laughing eyes '. . . mania for felines . . . always cheerful . . . takes 
her studying very seriously . . . cheerleader . . . unceasing energy, buoyant life ahead . . . 
willing to help anyone . . . mischievous . . . friends galore . . . not a beer-drinker . . . still, a 
party girl . . . captured at haverford in the good old days . . . swimming . . . and, oh, that 
Softball team . . . soccer fan . . . extremely neat and methodical ... the erb one . . . economics, 
y y FRANCES ELIZABETH FARRELL, Curundu, Canal Zone. Canal Zone's barefoot girl 
with cheek . . . storehouse of challenging wit and refreshing quips . . . expects the sardonic 
worst, and gets the best . . . philosophy is a den of thieves . . . ten-page letters, volleyball, 
chorus, and Spanish club . . . and still gets her nightly ten hours . . . one of the dining room's 
slowest eaters . . . gimme a good book, and thou ... ah, the lure of europe and all that culture 
. . . frances . . . english literature. 



Class 



0/1953 



NINA FELBER, Belle Harbor, 7<lew IVorfe. Brooklyn . . . big eyes on a little girl . . . charm 
comes in where logic breaks off, if the one doesn't get you, the other will . . . worries about 
people . . . hopes she's a liberal . . . modern dancer with a secret urge to play basketball . . . 
hanging gardens of sweet potatoes . . . can I write? . . . eager to live . . . english honors, y y 
ROBERT POLLARD FETTER, Winnetka, 111. That deceivingly wholesome look ... can be 
heard and seen anywhere . . . frustrated by platonic friendships . . . escapism thru travel . . . 
never buys a ticket . . . ask him about alaska . . . four year bearcat and j.v. wrestler . . . stands 
near the keg . . . phi delt first and student second . . . gentleman of percentages , . . investor . . . 
lover of Chicago tribune . . . gourmet spelled g-1-u-t-t-o-n . . . gets by somehow . . . radnor 
and the boys . . . inveterate weekender . . . economics, y y HANNI FEY, "Haverford, Penna. 
Lives in vil — sandwiches in somerville . . . freshmen day students' counselor . . . small, ener- 
getic, that big hello . . . formerly a swiss miss, now has a new allegiance . . . two summers of 
putney and. dick, lucky girl . . . has to finish that sweater before christmas . . . psych major, 
but doesn't let it get her down . . . psychology, y y WILLIAM C. FITTS, Mamaroneck, Tiew 
york. Swarthmore's answer to mighty joe young . . . campus' most fabulous sleeper, swearer, 
and sophist . . . plato and phi sig . . . tremendous aversion to classes, grinds, and intellectual 
dishonesty . . . leaves commons to play iron duke for the football squad . . . impressive and 
distressing combination of peter lorre, david hume, and michelangelo . . . 
that smile to one who needs a friend . . . diogenes without overcoat . . . 
english. y y JESSE GARRETT FORSYTHE, JR., Media, Penna. Trans- 
ferred to swarthmore via wilkes college and the navy as a junior . . . 
mechanical engineering, y y MARGARET ERASER, St. Paul, Minn. 
Transferred from midwest to commons in junior year . . . arrived with 
a bang on the marimba, kettle drums, and cymbals . . . probiert auf 
deutsch zu posieren . . . but it's so easy in english . . . gorgeous blond 
hair, climbing laugh and smile help , . . ten gallon hat and ranch pants 
. . . enthusiasm makes her matrix for interesting people . . . likes bach, 
mozart, haydn ... at the sign of the tang camel . . . european affinities 
. . . dorothy parker to see her through . . . peg . . . german. y yJOHN 
ANTON FRIEDERICY, ll'ashington, B.C. One man reason for the new 
administration policy and dances sometimes too . . . real rhythm . . . lab 
on friday ... I gotta study . . . perpetual woman troubles . . . theories 
on everything . . . universal language . . . tight dungarees . . . one man 
zoo . . . prehistoric man . . . weaned on dutch gin . . . nobody takes 
me seriously . . . man , without a country . . . champion dutch breast 
stroker, if you take him seriously . . . perennial chorus girl ... 60 rpm . . . 
phi psi . . . bans . . . civil engineering, y y IVAN HERZOG GABEL, 
Philadelphia, Penna. Big gas man . . . where's my car? . . , founder 
of bull moose . . . sloth trotter . . . staunch liberal . . . celebrates columbus day . . . loves 
long talks and short classes . . . frustrated ec major . . . clown when sober (draw your own 
conclusions) . . . has been known to be serious . . . night fighter . . . man of many moods but 
always amiable . . . max pimplehead's alter ego ... I think I've got the hots for her . . . 
eats babies ... phi psi .. . gabe . . . economics, y y JANE M. GALLAGHER, Elizabeth, 
'New Jersey. Gaily serious . . . whiz on any dance floor . . . self-winding individualist . . . social 
committee, hamburg show . . . but I do study! . . . those late dates . . . overwhelms friends with 
sober moments . . . prefers windows to doors, even when via rain gutter . . . Mary Lois and 
loose slate . . . everything's a coherent system . . . amazing sense of purpose . . . sincere and 
sensitive behind it all . . . english. y y RICHARD G. GAMAGE, Jiidley Park, Penna. Trips 
to florida . . . summers with nu-car . . . andy's cohort in misery at kappa sig . . . I'm too old for 
these women . . . days at the druggie, nights at green's . . . will talk about his army days on 
the mexican border . . . well-dressed tweed man . . . struggles through fine arts courses . . . will 
probably die of old age here . . . how about some camels, steve? . . . has been known to 
advertise on the water tower . . . ecoiiotiiics. y y GONSTANCE ORLEANS GAYL, Phila- 
delphia, Penna. My mind works best after midnight . . . host of acquaintances, as many friends 
. . . comfort before dignity: levis and sneaks . . . hacks up life, new yorker, and time for fabulous 
birthday card montages . . . incredible anecdotes enhanced by wild gesticulations . . . always 
ready to experiment (in international living) . . . unimpressed by pseudos . . . toujours gaie et 
cbarmante . . . perceptive ... in the words of one african salesman . . . psychology honors. 
y y NANCY LOUISE GIBBONS, Plainfield, New Jersey. Early mornings at the keyboard . . . 
bach and beethoven . . . reserved with a subtle sense of humor . . . but math is fun .. . gwimp 
. . . Softball manager . . . formation swimming . . . ambitious and persevering . . . scf . . . 
chorus, g and s . . . crossword puzzles . . . bartol — aspirant to pi mu society . . . generous and 
cheerful ... no place like Vermont . . . ditto . . . mathematics. 




class of 1953 




THEODORE GOODFRIEND, Philadelphia, Venna. Too much energy for four labs . . . took 
up g and s and the 220 hurdles . . . ego wrestling with extroversion . . . notable renditions 
on the guitar . . . love, oh careless love, miss oatis regrets . . . the goodfriend nobody knows 
. . . novels and the flute . . . inveterate experimenter . . . now just a minute! . . . more passion 
than precision . . . but wait till he gets his m.d. . . . zoology honors, y y JANE GRAHAM, 
Brooklyn, T^I. y. Transplanted from the mid-west . . . essential assistant to harried hamburg 
and g and s directors . . . aids with advice and aspirin . . . frustrated actress-intellectual-singer- 
dancer . . . hamburger with alfred wigglesworth warren . . . curious eyes, spurious ideas, furious 
ideals, combined with surprising capability . . . triumph through tribulation but in victory, never 
vengeful . . . the essense of all things to the x of femininity . . . janie . . . english honors, y y 
JOHN WALKER GRAY, Saint Paul, Minn. Math libe by 8:30 . . . conservative in the fall 
. . . confused in the winter . . . sure in the spring ... do you want to buy half a car? . . . 
wary of entangling alliances, until . . . seeks a synthesis of minnesota snow and new hampshire . 
hills . . . art for art's sake . . . frequently right but still frjendly . . . never satiated . . . finds 
seniors attractive . . . and that fudge from home . . . this is a good thing . . . physics honors. 
y y ROBERT ALFORD GRIEST, JR., Washington, D.C. One of the bob twins . . . brains 
beneath an unobtrusive exterior . . . sailor's gait, sheepish smile . . . every step looks like his 
last . . . remarkable memory when prodded . . . lacrosse, bearcats' 
pitching arm . . . ardent i.f. leaguer . . . d u . . . perpetually dateless 
. . . hey bob, watcha get for? . . . play you a game of ping-pong . . . 
who's got the funnies? . . . mechanical engineering, y y ROBERT 
G. GROSSMAN, Bronx-, SVeii' 3'ork. Bronx park as bucolic as he can 
stand . . . desultory guitar . . . bursts of shakespeare, shelley, and 
chansons . . . avid follower of ballet, folk music, and pogo . . . torn 
between cognitive maps and cell membranes . . . grossman chuckles 
as science marches on . . . believes in ghosts . . . everything is reduce- 
able to farce . . '. celibate till age seven ... at ease before on rushing 
autos and departing trains . . . zoology honors, y y KATHERINE 
MERRILL GLILICK, South Casco, Maine. Long walks in crum col- 
lecting specimens for menagerie . . . boils rat skulls in roommate's 
teapot . . . I'm a big girl now . . . sailor and skier out of her 
habitat . . . submersive activities . . . new englander and proud of it . . . but I like sweet- 
breads . . . nine o'clock bedtime and twenty four hour smiles . . . part cow, part angel . . . 
kate . . . biology, y y ROBERT J. GUMNIT, Philadelphia, Penna. Philosophical pre-med . . . 
minors in phil because he likes it . . . will wind up a faith-healer . . . good natured pessimist, 
groaning happily about almost anything . . . wry machiavellian speculations about love, women, 
etc. . . . meteoric rise in sn led to station managership,- did a fine job, now looking for a way 
out . . . kaleidoscopic vocabulary . . . says what he thinks . . . can't help being a good fellow 
in spite of himself . . . zoology honors, y y ELEANOR HALL, %ent, Conn. Ex-physics major 
in math . . . prefers psych . . . can't decide between the alice in wonderland look or the sophisti- 
cated bum . . . sleeps through german . . . don't get her on the subject of her family . . . slackers 
anonymous . . . slow and deliberate manner of speech keeps listeners in suspense . . . archery 
. . . pagliacci and the russian novels . . . hall's a hacker . . . gwimp . . . but they're not brats, 
I like them . . . lee . . . mathematics, y y JANET HELEN HAND, Chicago, 111. I'd better 
write myself a note . . . puns, mostly painful . . . texan for a while . . . there is too such a place 
as yoakum! . . . hold that tiger . . . three letters a jveek . . . blind date bureau . . . mammoth 
breakfasts while friends wait . . . immediately if not sooner . . . chronic worrier . . . somerville 
conducting campus tours . . . always ready to do someone a good turn . . . ethics and ideals . . . 
personality plus . . . fine arts, y y ELIZABETH HARLOW, Westbrook, Conn. Quiet warmth 
and friendly interest . . . too much energy too early in the morning . . . one pamphlet after 
another and a desk companion too . . . letters with return address a yard long ... oh ! I'm so 
far behind it's funny . . . her wide eyes gleam and we know there's a secret that she can't 
keep much longer . . . knitting sticks to her fingers . . . right now it's olive drab . . . plans 
. . . history, y y BRICE HARRIS, JR., State College, Penna. State college forever! ... phi delt, 
bearcat, icg treasurer, and sn wheel . . . arrives at ultra-liberal opinions intuitively . . . camou- 
flages a serious mind with a careless attitude . . . shaddup, I gotta study . . . can talk about 
anything . . . collegiate with taste . . . where's the spirit in this place? •. . . seven hours of 
sleep or else ... for small towns, public schools, and penn state . . . history honors, y y 
LUDWIG HARTMAN, Hotweil, li'urtenburg, Qermany. A bit lost in a strange land . . . long 
black curly hair . . . quite reserved . . . child-like 'charm . . . old-world courtliness . . . amazingly 
sympathetic and warm hearted but don't offend his honor . . . explosive ... a clever and often 
satiric wit . . . both scientist and romanticist . . . wishes he lived on campus . . . dislikes 
intensely anything resembling authoritarianism . . . next greatest loves are music and the 
theater . . . chemistry. 



class oj \953 



ir-r^ 




DAVID HARVEY, QradyviUe, Venna. . . . zoology, y y SUE HARVEY, CrawfordsviUe, 
Indiana. Periodic moods ... yet basic cheerfulness not long surpressed ... I'm going to enter 
a monastery . .-. unpretentious thoughtfulness . . . intuitive sympathy . . . time for everyone 
. . and everything . . . affinity for traumatic experiences . . . genuine love of music . . . 
draws line only at roommate's singing . . . perpetual chuckler . . .• laughs even in sleep . . . 
we do wear shoes in Indiana . . . innumerable friends . . . your neighbor counts most . . . susie 
english UteraUire. y y GEORGE SANDS HASTINGS, Darien, Connecticut. Suburban 
hill-billy . . . records the campus for posterity and sn . . . remember me as sykes? . . . pivot 
man for g and s . . . a Savoyard, and don't you forget it . . . determined cross country per- 
formance . . . those bell bottom trousers ... an endless succession of recording machines . . . 
not atheist, pantheist . . . sandy hair and that school-girl complexion ... 1 spent two days 
looking for the unexpurgated version . . . english literature, y y PRISCILLA HAYWARD, 
Jlidgewood, Tv/eif Jersey. The practical romanticist . . . hoo-jee . . . president of back to nature 
movement (outing club) . . . hair of gold, eyes of blue . . . typical woman driver, runs bicycle 
wrecking agency . . . didja bring me any sugar papers for my collection? . . . halcyon pho- 
tographer with box camera . . . boiled cat heads . . . je no comprend pas . . . split personality: 
quiet, persevering, ernest, but gregarious, mischevious, curious — I wanna see! . . . pris . . . 
psychology, y y PETER DOUW HEAGLE, Ossining, T^ew 3'orfe. 
Well-meaning, dependable plugger . . . noisy when aroused, with a 
bray that carries a mile ... a roudy at heart . . . Cheshire cat grin 
. . . addicted to pipes . . . woman back home . . . former gridder, 
with talents sublimated to lacrosse . . . cross-country for exercise . . . 
d u . . . those summer sessions . . . new camera devotee . . . ossining, 
you know, where sing sing is ; . . the beagle . . . pete . . . mechanical 
engineering, y y HELGA LOUISE HEARST, East Orange. T^ew 
Jersey. Thoughts from math to northern michigan . . . laugh you'd 
know anywhere . . . scf . . . co-captain formation swimming ... a 
grind, but always with time for a little fun or the movies ... I don't 
know how you can enjoy that horrible biology, it's so awful . . . 
physics is just not understandable . . . housework is something I guess 
I'll have to get used to . . . mathematics, y y NANCY ANNE 
HEYROTH, Cincinnati, Ohio. Swam once, now intellectualized . . . lynxy, slinksy, modem 
dance . . . symphonic snacks between cookbooks, knitting, puzzles and being a good listener 
. . . studies also . . . campus druggie until it died . . . practicing perseverance on the piano . . . 
interested in psychological drama, both read and acted in varying locales . . . teaching 
beckons with a broken fingernail . . . quick spurts up magill . . . commons revisited . . . coffee 
. . . eetheereal . . . whimsey the poo . . . nancy . . . english honors, y y MARYHELEN 
HINTZ, Queens, T^ew 3'orfe. Bubbling exterior yet reflective nature . . . wants to do everything, 
understand everything, be a part of everything . . . idealist who lacks objectivity . . . poetic . . . 
I'm in love again . . . sea since freshman year . . . conference mania . . . studies in math 
libe? . . . gnashes teeth in sleep . . . can't sing but does . . . easily persuaded to waste time . . . 
cute in jeans . . . grandma's nightgown . . . future plans: social work, writing . . . mel is latin 
for honey . . . english honors, y y CAROL OTIS HOLBROOK, T^ew Jork City, T^ew Jork. 
Merry laughter and warm greeting . . . those large economy-sized ambitions . . . pleasantly 
opinionated ... let us raise the status of those two oppressed groups, women and navahoes . . . 
expert listener, continually drawing out other people . . . but I think ... 10 p.m. excursions, 
but not unaccompanied . . . how simply marvelous . . . beautiful dreamer . . . carol . . . political 
science honors, y y DONALD HOLCROFT, CLiesfer, Venna. . . . mechanical engineering. 
y y WERNER HONIG, flushing, SVeiu y'ork. One-man melting pot . . . germany, turkey, 
tennessee, new york . . . european polish at times smeared over with studied brooklynese . . . 
psych, honors, but really frustrated violinist . . . college is for intellectual e.xercise . . . harem- 
interested ... if you like blue eyes . . . nostalgia for the medieval and romantic . . . moonlight 
duels and pagan rites . . . well versed in affairs of honor . . . do-nothing presidency over gemian 
club . . . pipe and beret . . . wemer . . . psychology honors, y y ROBERT BRUCE HOWELL, 
TAillville, SVeip Jersey. Ex-marine with brains to boot . . . never yet lost an argument . . . you 
think you have it tough?, you should be an ee . . . campus hypochondriac ... 140 pounds 
of muscle, aches and pains . . . geez, do I feel awful . . . unrelenting optimisms with a touch 
of irreconcilable pessimism . . . mealtime is a time to relax . . . extremes in cars . . . varsity 
football . . . pole vault record . . . ex-wrestler . . . du . . . shut the window, I'm freezing . . . 
howell . . . electrical engineering. 



dflss of 1953 




ELEANOR GARDNER HUTCHESON, Xingsloii, Venna. Do we really look alike . . . rage 
to live . . . bubbling enthusiasm for every and all . . . jazz fiend and jimmie ryan's rooter . . . 
flash bulb gal . . . o-ooh . . . organizing genius personified . . . collects people's troubles for 
sympathetic reasons . . . fabulous field trips . . . nantucket narratives . . . let's sing some college 
songs . . . always on the go . . . irreconcilable dicotomy: party girl with philosophic yearnings 
. . . hutch . . . zoology, y y PETER IRVINE, Broimnlle, S\'eu) Jork. The black end of the 
intellectual spectrum . . . imitates any and all, especially himself . . . onetime addict of 520 
fitzgeraldiana, thomas wolfe, and lacrosse . . . switched to bard and cracker room . . . long 
hours on the guitar . . . with true exeter fervor, will sneer at anything once . . . seriously 
though, what am I doing here . . . someday she'll come along . . . yeah . . . hook . . . english 
honors. / y CAROLYN JOHNSON, Crete, 7<!ehraska. Walks with kings, talks with crowds 
. . . esthete from crete, nebraska . . . orgies of art in trotter basement . . . social conscience with 
a grain of salt ... a world of understanding in an epigram . . . too wise to be consistent . . . 
pantheistic mechanistic gestaltist ... I hate it here ... I love it here . . . thinks she's funny 
sometimes . . . is . . . appallingly unsystematic, works anywiy . . . shades of Titian . . . cali 
. . . psychology honors, y y CHARLES LOUIS JONES, PleasantviUe, 0<Sew Jersey. Prep 
serenader . . . kid athlete . . . mat and grid terror . . . vendors license in a c . . . the coke 
man always rings twice . . . summer at shore financed by phi psi 
till . . . stack explorer . . . considerate of heat and light at phi psi 
house . . . mrs. d's adopted son . . . quiet and sincere . . . restless 
sleeper . . . glad to see ping-pong table go . . . annual chorus girl 
. . . half-hearted ec major . . . buck . . . economics, y y THOMAS 
DARLINGTON JONES, JR., Ardmore, Penna. Four wheeled per- 
sonality . . . s man . . . future major leaguer . . . throws it faster at 
the women than the plate . . . what will it be this fall, cross country 
. . . academic vicissitudes . . . casual . . . tigertown clothes . . . bums 
the candle at both ends, then lights it in the middle . . . honest officer, 
that's my real name . . . bmoc . . . kappa sig . . . but dean, we were 
only leaning on the goal posts . . . tommy . . . history, y y BAR- 
BARA KEAY, Plymouth, Mass. The original plymouth rock . . . much 
loved by kinder, psychos and swarthmorons . . . hall pres . . . fresh- 
man counselor . . . varisty swimming . . . this time I'm really going to stop smoking . . . mother 
confessor . . . puritan stock, well-diluted . . . must be appreciated to be known ... . oh my 
sainted auhnt . . . bobby, barb, barbie, babar . . . psychology, y y ROBERT LAURIE KEIGH- 
TON, Sicarthmore, Penna. Breaking family tradition, unchemically independent . . . deserting 
norman thomas, going into politics himself . . . gifted pianist with a future . . . bicycles up to 
brandywine in ^pare time . . . sometimes goes to classes ... could teach his future wife how 
to cook . . . public interest friend . . . letters to new york times . . . seemingly reserved, but 
unpredictable; prankster . . . wavy hair — not toni . . . bob . . . history, y y CHARLES FRED- 
ERICK KELLERS, TAontclair, l^lew Jersey. Mary lyon inmate . . . suitcase full of books, 
kleenex, radio tubes and 9h pencils . . . thinks his oscillograph is better than television . . . even 
the bloody queen don't get cocoa . . . the first mathematician to have solved for the bugger 
factor . . . I'm through with women — I think she likes me . . . member of enders' slave labor 
wood-chopping gang . . . all-1-1 right, roommate . . . fred . . . physics, y y NANCY JARRETT 
KELLEY, Sharon yiill, Penna. Friends' central's most loyal alum . . . original sense of humor 
. . . struggles with recorder . . . gwimp . . . assistant hockey manager . . . class hockey — won't 
anyone play, please . . . but my alarm didn't go off . . . supports commons' store . . . phoenix 
. . . french club . . . knitting: one sock per year . . . chorus and g and s . . . profound . . . 
perceptive and sensitive . . . ambition — to be a gourmet . . . ditto . . . history, y y IRVING G. 
KENNEDY, Stony Point, T^ew york. Strong, quiet, and handsome . . . prefers sleeping out, 
at home on the trail . . . warm personality and exceptional regard for feelings of others . . . 
sometimes carefree . . . amazing powers of concentration when studying . . . penetrating 
thoughts . . . unconverted by sfc . . . cross country, track, phi delt . . . pre-med in history 
. . . likes old shoes, shaves in bed . . . better get a date for tonight . . . why would anybody 
be crazy enough to live in mary lyons . . . irv . . . bisfory honors, y y GEORGE NICOLAS 
KRIVOBOK, Eaubonne, 7rance. Parisian, despite the name . . . loaded with what must be 
french charm ... oh, merrrrcredi . . . likes american girls and things . . . travelled, cultured, 
speaks many languages . . . will probably be a diplomat or something . . . Spanish, y y JEAN 
KUDO, Xirbana, Illinois. Systems . . . time out to organize and write those little lists . . . apples 
qnd ingleneuk divotee . . . delicious sense of humor_ . . . warmth . . . always neat and sparkling 
. . . well-tempered domestic streak . . . independent . . . not too good at lower math . . . manages 
to circulate the finx each week . . . make-up crew veteran . . . badminton . . . roccatorso . . . 
english. 



I 



class oj 1953 




PAUL WOLF KUZNETS, "Melrose Park, Tenna. The cynical one . . . keeps enthusiasm well 
suppressed . . . munchausian mind . . . perpetrator of painful puns . . . avid advocate of asinine 
abstractions in alliterated argument . . . permanent resident of cutting . . . suspected of being 
a former tchaikovsky sympathizer . . . hatches mammoth papers . . . severe critic searching for 
absolute values in a relativist world ... a sometime sda'er . . . conscientious icg'er . . . noted for 
calling co-eds . . . females . . . nicknames not printable . . . political science honors. ^ i 
PHILIP LANDECK, Tiew 3'ork, Tiew JorV. "Who's going to buy my beer? . . .ex-athlete . . . 
fiddles with music . . . I'm willing to clean the room; you organize . . . greek god . . . prexy of 
everything — mec to soph class . . . I've got a reputation to uphold . . . supports plushie's . . . 
basically idealistic, but won't admit it . . . sure that he isn't sure . . . insomnia without kay 
wylie . . . declarations of independence . . , my fault? it's merson . . . engtish honors, y y 
CAROL NORMA LANGE, Varien, Conn. Dispersed interests . . . sailor, the bass fiddle, and 
enthusiasm for politics . . . attempt to hide feelings . . . telltale facial expressions . . . mingles 
her sense of humor with her bridge game . . . gilbert and sullivan fervor . . . let's go to the 
fire . . . opposition to affectation . . . always a disturbing influence in the library . . . puppy 
lover . . . she keeps them in her room . . . the palmer back apartment . . . political science, y y 
GAIL LANKENAU, It'hite Plains, T^ew Jork. Had enough of girls' institutions ... I had an 
experience in the druggie tonight . . . newly addicted bridge fiend . . . 
english major? major? . . . cheer up — things will get worse before they get 
better . . . gwimp . . . realized her lifelong ambition at swarthmore — 
artistic talents (you'll lose your sinus) displayed at dangerous heights . . . 
harum-scarum . . . english. y y MARY RAE LAW, Brookline, TAdss. 
Developed experimental neurosis in honors situation . . . well, that's un- 
attractive . . . pernicious inertia . . . never considers work before mid- 
night, never does it after . . . half-hearted athlete . . . manic expressive 
. . . plays it naive, is deceptively convincing . . . wouldn't be happy if she 
didn't worry . . . worries all the time . . . monkey-face ... 1 am not . . . 
dresses with greatest of care . . . mamie . . . english honors, y y 
MICHAEL BARTON LAWS, Cheyney, Venna. Perpetual slump with 
grin on top . . . gigantic mind under slight exterior . . . four years varsity 
wrestler, struggles with soccer, manages track for training meals . . . 
phi delt without pin . . . passion for old fords . . . the heap . . . frustrated 
doctor . . . ask him about the '49 hamhurg show . . . may I have a 
drag? . . . sophisticated side seldom shows . . . lunch club at the lodge , . . parties . . . extreme 
even temper . . . history, y y JOSEPH S. LEVINE, Brooklyn, J^ew york. Slept his way 
through college . . . florida tan from florida sun lamp . . . phi psi minute man . . . pre-med- 
itated . . . erstwhile bill tilden . . . belligerent at fornials . . . florida flash . . . dynamite . . . 
near genius (sits next to one) . . . practical poker . . . undefeated grappler . . . hialeah's best 
customer . . . fast women and slow horses will ruin any man . . . just plain joe . . . zoology, y y 
ARTHLIR S. LEVY, Hinghamton, T^ew 3'orfe. Cultivates large but useless vocabulary to impress 
friends . . . possesses a large unread library to impress visitors . . , pretenses generally seen 
through . . . dabbler in natural science . . . bird watching from hawk mountain to florida . . . 
look, there goes a rare lepidoptera . . . swimming team, s.o.c, debate . . . vulgarity in the 
orchestra pit . . . pushkin at football practice . . . supercilious smile . . . invariably outnumbered 
in bull sessions . . . I'm going to transfer to Cornell . . . physics honors, y y ELIZABETH 
LIKERT, .^tin Arbor, Michigan. Majoring in water ballet . . . often found swimming in record 
shops . . . that's hysterical . . . affectionate blond . . . light-haired, light-headed . . . memory 
'/^ inch long . . . overflow of enthusiasm and giggles belies practical nature . . . 6-3-3 sets the 
college record . . . game tickets galore but follows michigan by radar . . . congenial and con- 
vivial . . . prospective club-woman . . . practicality triumphant . . . betsy . . . economics, y y 
JOAN BARTRAM LITT, Locust Valley, J^ew Jork. Swarthmore's touch of disquieting beauty 
. . . passionate devotion to fitzgerald and unmade beds . . . own personal sense of the aesthetic 
... in my own sweet way . . . starry-eyed, but hates to admit it . . . appealing confusion at the 
bridge table . . . that shuffle in and out of english classes . . . music, cigarettes, and food in the wee 
small hours . . . hopes to grow up someday . . . english. y y WILLIAM PAUL LIVANT, 
'Brooklyn, T^ew york. Socio-economico-genito-psycho-philosophico-methodological orientation . . . 
I growl when I play the piano ... on a soiree with faure ... a regular fugueing machine . . . 
is this a bloody foetus 1 see before me . . . my mother sends me noodle soup and advice . . . 
profs, friends and relations fried on sizzling epigrams . . . not oscar . . . uncle billy . . . 
psychology honors, y y WERNER M. LUCHT, Benvyn, Venna. Synonym for Lucht — drole 
humor, but strictly Luchtian . . . fought the weather in the air force . . . loves the wild west, 
especially cowboy movies . . . everlasting blue chevvie . . . hey men, who's gonna drive . . . 
likes his milk served with a head . . . basically shy, but . . . marathon on the soccer sidelines 
. . . camera bug . . . who pulled your chain . . . staunch du . . . conscientious, dependable, 
considerate . . . history. 



class oj 1953 




GAIL BOURNE MACMAHON, Croton-on-Hiidson, Mew Jork. Ingenuous beauty, with a 
pencil behind one ear . . . gracious inner serenity . . . vivacious enthusiasm . . . executive: gosh, 
I only sent out 150 notices this week . . . rustling leaves and the windy outdoors . . .. say, you 
know I'm really growing up . . . will be seen playing violin in underdeveloped areas . . . over the 
hills and far away . . . poUtknl science hcncrs. y y ANN MAC MILLAN, Belmar, lA'eit' Jork. 
Natural good looks . . . enthusiasm, vitality . . . what, only three meetings tonight? . . . countless 
activities but all performed with an eye to perfection . . . efficient by necessity . . . but where 
would she be without her little notes . . . optimist and athlete in spite of herself . . . always 
neat ... I just loves it, or him . . . du pin and Sydney . . . honesty and sincerity her 
virtues . . . someday I'll have to stop to think that out . . . annie laurie . . . psychology, y y 
PHILLIP MACY, Cansdowne, Venna. Fifteen dollar fiasco . . . known for his infamous short- 
cuts and many water-tower exploits . . . strike out artist, with the women . . . hot rod . . . 
son of herman . . . lackadaisical b student . . . part time swab . . . good party man . . . pivot 
man with a vengeance — sure shot from the first row . . . any camels, steve? . . . perennial 
bearcat — varsity when coaxed . . . enthusiastic phi psi, when it comes to pledge trips . . . mace 
. . . bonedome'. . . iiw/or? y ^ CLARK PARKER MANGELSDORF, Cambridge, T^iass. Look 
for the brown packet, he's always with it . . . big and gentle . . . they raise 'em big in texas 
. . . forty bucks is a lot for a cup of cocoa ... an artist with tools, 
sometime cartoonist with pen . . . for a buddy anything . . . one of 
the species that seems to tlirive under domestication . . . beer, beethoven 
and betty lou . . . some people got no sense of humor! . . . c. p. . . . 
civil engineering, .f y FREDERICK ERNEST MANGELSDORF, 
Vori ArXhur, Jexas. Everything is better in texas . . . the texan 
flag on the water tower . . . sailing mit, construction Itc. decora- 
tions social committee ... his tools are clean and well oiled . . . and 
tear everything apart . . . bearcat . . . pogo, the greatest creation of 
our time . . . sigma tau . . . civil engineering, y y ANDREW LEE 
.MARCH, Swarthmore, Venna. Returns to the local scene via kenyon 
and france . . . distinguished polj'glot with song repertoire for every 
language . . . can't be heard above a whisper . . . most amazing ex- 
terior expresses equally amazing innards . . . gets mad at things, not 
at people . . . roger's brother . . . party tonight . . ^ french honors, y y CAROL MARTIN, 
!MiUcaukee, ll'isconsin. Mad binges with hammer and screw driver, should've been an engineer 
. . . fire corporal par excellence . . . worships gilbert and sullivan and whistles in the morning . . . 
lover of the arts . . . saxophone hidden in closet . . . passion for creating order out of chaos 
. . . blond example of what a little lemon juice can do . . . but there used to be fish in whitefish 
bay . . . fine arts l.iotiors. y y BETTY ELISE MAX, Tialtimore, Maryland. What is Saturday 
like at swarthmore . . . transfer from holyoke . . . pin from penn . . . petite and sparkling . . . 
I've ten minutes at the libe before lee's train comes in . . . always hunting up guinea pigs for 
psych . . . doesn't wake up when someone comes in, just says hello . . . unfailing adaptability 
and I know the nicest boy at penn . . . wouldn't you like to meet him . . . psycl.iolo^y. y y 
MARGERY TAFT McCLOSKEY, Englewood. T^^ew Jersey. McClots . . . enthusiasm and 
optimism personified . . . phi delt pin . . . mary and carol, do we have any cigarettes . . . admirer 
of Shakespeare, thurber, and the dodgers . . . where did I leave my wallet . . . fervent new 
yorker from new jersey . . . summers in Connecticut . . . this is quite mal-fortunate . . . she and 
mike share love for dixieland jazz . . . sweetness and smiles except when she's grum . . . the palmer 
back apartment . . . marky . . . english. y y JEANNE McKEE, Jenafly, \New Jersey. Would 
rather listen to everybody's troubles than study . . . lets things get disorganized so she can 
organize them . . . hectic bus5'ness, but always time for one more thing . . . motherly . . . chicken 
carcasses . . . life in the round . . . empathizes and sympathizes . . . Christopher fry and hous- 
man . . . talent for self-deprecation . . . always a lender and a borrower be . . . needs to be 
needed . . . jan . . . english. y y MARC MERSON, 7\'ew Jork, 3Veu' 3'orfe. As a matter of 
fact . . . varsity basketball, tennis: good for five minutes . . . musical inclination with strings 
attached . . . has the game down to a science . . . socks inside-out so asa won't show . . . drunk 
on three beers if he wants . . . truth over tack, attacked . . . ham in hamburg, dud in ruddi- 
gore: brought down both houses . . . careless facade over deep foundation . . . my fault? it's 
landeck's . . . bud . . . english honors, y y .NICHOLAS DA\'1D MEYER, yew Jork, Mew 
york. Quiet, but liked by all . . . ping pong champ . . . card shark . . . conscientious student 
and athlete . . . phi psi . . . sensitive and considerate . . . perpetual woman hater . . . clean liver 
. . . pride of ever}' coach . . . varsity basketball and golf . . . next president of commons . . . 
infecting laugh and unsurpassable sense of humor . '. . goes steady with his roommates ... aw 
jeez . . . illegitimate beer . . . nearsighted pilot . . . bull session fanatic . . . economics. 



class oj 1953 



MORTON S. MILLER, College Park, "Md. Always something to do . . . dodo and halcyon 
design, posters par ey.ce\lence, flats, grease paint and buskin . . . handsomest single room in 
wharton . . . but it's functional . . . punctual and precise, polished manner . . . hates tuxedos but 
looks well in one . . . bach and gilbert & sullivan ... I smoke like a furnace . . . red sails in the 
sunset . . . the clocks all stopped at ten to five . . . it's nice to get up in the morming, but 
it's nicer to lie in your bed . . . english botiors. y y STANLEY MILLS, Latvrence, Long 
Island. SN sports and discs . . . collection committee . . . mills music . . . boston pops played 
sleigh-ride last night . . . but don't you know that plus goes down as a c? . . . inimitable im- 
personations of the great and the small . . . the girl I marry will have to be . . . get that fat cat 
outta here! . . . listen, this is the greatest . . . you're kidding . . . indefatigable upholder of 
american system . . . never loses connection with the outside world . . . favors the common 
sense approach . . . history, y ^ CHRISTOPHER .MONTGOMERY, T^^ew 3'orfe, 7^'ew york. 
People's artist writing his swan song ... if we turn the bassoon part upside down it harmonizes 
. . . the spark in every crum campfire . . . lincoln walks at midnight, sleeps in dayilght, eats 
guitar strings at twilight . . . whose gonna investigate the man who investigates the dean . . . 
now, henry, suppose we drag the rat through by the tail; his motion picture will run backwards 
... he will eat with sticky goo . . . rats don't think so good as humans . . . kit . . . psychology 
_^^^^^^^^ boiiors. y f MARGUERITE L. MOREY, Buffalo, ^^^ew 3'orfe. Athleti- 
^^^^^^^^^^^H cally inclined: sensitive about tomboy tendencies . . . nautically advanced: 
I^H^^^PHHjB raised on Canadian shore of erie . . . orthografikally retarded . . . pro- 
; "", ■ gressively schooled, and not ashamed of it . . . freckle-faced: lemon juice 
[^^^^ will take 'em away . . . thoroughly forgetful: I'm always losing some- 

^I^^B^^^^^ thing . . . actively sympathetic: warmth and depth of human emotions . . . 

^Jw " ^^ generally helpful: handy with barber shears . . . constantly cheerful, but 

\ Vifc ^ Tl easily serious . . . margie . . . bisfory. y y DAVID FARRELL MORGAN, 
^ !^ iH !A'eu' york, 7^'ew york. Cosmopolitan par excellence . . . right clothes, 

>,^^I-;g^gHHM|a| right time, right place . . . conspicuously inconspicuous is the ideal . . . 
gi/^^FT^a^^^^H conservative with a big c . . . anti-intellectual, he thinks . . . antipathy 
II hB X; 'l^^^^^l for campus liberals revealed by self-styled seminar reactionism . . . that's 
^B^^ .^^^^H meaningless . . . penetrating humor . . . jazz enthusiast . . . those vacation 
!^^^^H retreats at ryans' . . . general semantics . . . momism has got to go . . . 
kwink, community chest, young republican, phidelt . . . cowboy in the 
rain . . . history honors, y y ROBERT B. MORIN, Canton, Ohio . . . chemistry honors. 
Y y ANNE MOTT, INew york, T^ew york. Blue eyed magic, with a solid side . . . serenity and 
innocence but a mischievous twinkle . . . diligent and disciplined student . . . forever searching, 
with implicit trust that there's good to be found . . . and to be done . . . propensity for huggable 
men . . . toneless singing . . . companionable insults . . . midnight meanderings . . . reverence for 
life . . . and people . . . practicing idealist with hardy courage and keen sensitivity . . . english 
honors, y y MERRILLAN MURRAY, Chevy Chase, Md. Pert and vivacious . . . active 
intellect . . . always on the run . . . genuine interest in others . . . perpetually writing papers . . . 
photography fiend . . . the perfect room-mate . . . background SN-er . . . camping trips . . . 
sews, cooks, and paints houses . . . desperate attempt at eight hours sleep per night . . . out of 
hibernation ever>' other weekend . . . no, it isn't marilj'n, but it doesn't matter . . . when is a 
grind not a grind? . . . history honors, y y EDWARD FREDRIC MYERS, Pine Plains, T^^ew 
york. Want a tennis lesson? . . . big man, big heart . . . loves his uke and recorder, also classical 
music . . . earnest and harried proctor . . . thrives on wsga weekends . . . education major . . . 
some profs give the corniest tests_ . . . ardent garnet clubber . . . man o' the world . . . one 
thousand and one interests . . . will always be helping others . . . well how do you like that 
. . . jacksonian independence and forcefulness . . . big ed . . . political science, y y ANNE 
KE\X'BEGI.\I, Cambridge, iMass. Plans mass suicide in protest of world situation ... no superego 
. . . which pair of levis shall I wear . . . never smokes whole cigarette, just two halves . . . life 
is a trap . . . visions freudian . . . innately communistic, especially about college property . . . 
horses are smarter than people . . . logically illogical . . . impulse becomes determination . . . 
impatient puritan . . . refuses to admit obvious naivete . . . sensitive, aesthetic features within 
and without . . . nancy . . . english honors, y y ALAN NEWELL, 7('orc«fer, !Mass. Con- 
firmed new england accent and proud of it . . . combines it with cosmopolitan outlook . . . zoo 
major with outside interests: outing club, classical music, liberal politics . . . sda, dreams of 
intellectual socialism, conser\'ative approach . . . knight in the world of gambits . . . have you by 
chance time for a quick game of chess? ... or three . . . maybe even four? . . . zoology, y y 
KARL E. NICOLAI, I'ero Beach, 7la. Deep-thinking, serious-minded pre-med with a good 
bedside manner . . . when I was at farragut . . . smooth, sex)'-voiced baritone of hamburg shows 
... a man's man but women go for his innate charm and impeccable dress . . . earnest, straight- 
forward . . . studious when necessary but has vigorous contempt for ivory-towerism and intol- 
erant radicals . . . varied interests . . . sally, lacrosse, band, florida, kappa sig . . . will defend 
his strong and lasting principles at the drop of a petition . . . satirical sense of humor and 
hearty laugh . . . knows what he wants and goes after it . . . usually gets it . . . nick . . . zoology. 



class oj 1953 




ARIELLE NORTH, jilorristown, 7<lew Jersey. Fights for her new jersey mountains . . . mid- 
west waater . . . french hall inmate for two years . . . roller skating for energetic relaxation . . . 
insatiable ping-pongist . . . hey not or cheery cluck in the halls . . . brilliant red-striped model 
a ford at home . . . renoir and hoff . . . thurber and emerson . . . perpetually knitting compli- 
cated argyles . . . pack-rat . . . inexhaustible literary supplies from home . . . nature enthusiast 
. . . everyone's confidant . . . english honors, y y THEODORE KENT OSGOOD, Lexington, 
T^ass. Analytic functions of historical variables . . . found either at top of mount Washington or 
parrish hall . . . t-shirts till snow flies . . , schussbaumer . . . probly . . . I.e. . . . past, present, 
future exec . . . but this is not the issue . . . phoenix, math club, ire — the study of nativeal 
costumes . . . my grandfather . . . halfway up and halfway down . . . zivjela the yugoslav b&m 
. . . tedd . . . history honors, y y ALISON OWEN, Tiopkinton, T^ew Hampshire. Commons 
to clothier and back; majoring in the unsung side of drama . . . i'm an uncle . . . new hampshire 
farm and a twin brother . . . interest in science is purely extra-curricular . . . folk-songs and 
square-dancing . . . parker is good for the soul . . . cigarettes, coffee, and profanity during a 
show . . . there's only one I . . . sleeps through radios, lights, and typing, but will you kids 
in the hall kindly shut up! . . . forsan et haec olim meminisse juvabit . . . english. y y LAW- 
RENCE BUZBY OWEN, ll'oodstown, ?^ew Jersey. Pre-med with liberal arts outlook ... one 
of ave Wake's many big dumb linemen . . . basketball manager and 
kwink ... is that the library over there by the road to Chester . . . 
du . . . gets most of exercise walking through crum . . . dixieland . . . 
one of trumpet tooters for the garnet rooters . . . larry . . . zoology. 
y y BERTHA PALANKY, Jrenton, ?<Iew Jersey. Swarthmore's hun- 
garian black blood . . . our bouncy, bubbling, bountiful bertie . . . 
frustrated musical talent with vengeance on the glockenspiel ... in- 
tellectually curious, curiously intellectual . . . the world is just a 
Vj^^ little too big ... a call to arms at the bridge table . . . sympathetic 

''■ — ' ' eyes and a combustible laugh . . . english major when she isn't too 

sleepy ... oh, you're not serious ... a ribbon in the hair . . . bert 
. . . english. y y PETER S. K. PAO, '?lanking China. Sleep major, 
tennis and e.e. minor . . . when you get your work done, I'll copy it 
. . . foolish laugh . . . '36 dodge . . . wisecracks in class . . . don't 
call me payo . . . let's take break . . . cuts one-third of his classes . . . 
. . but you're a liberal arts major . . . Chinese on lab reports . . . i 
. little guy with the big briefcase . . . let's go to second show . . . pete . . . 
y y GEORGE PAPANEK, SN'eu' Jork, T^ew Jork. Sweater boy . . . 
ham on stage, I'll take mine on rye ... oh, no, I won't be a bad baronet, I assure you . . . 
four dimensional baritone with dramatic quiver . . . xmas caroler with cherub smile ... I can't 
go to sleep yet, tom isn't home . . . ex-track man, also ran for office, now running for cover 
. . . psychological ancestors, intended psychological progeny . . . wiener kreis man . . . george, 
pop . . . psychology honors, y y JOHN BARSTOW PATERSON, :Middletown, Conn. Un- 
sullied idealist . . . titilating corsages . . . springtime tennis major . . . social committee mainstay 
. . . community service galore town work, international relations . . . mec man . . . kwink 
link . . . ministerial bent . . . laureled poet . . . unc . . . ambition for five languages . . . biggest 
groan: women — can't live with 'em, can't do without 'em ... 1 say c-section is best . . . has a 
holy passion for mottos ... a genuine desire to help . . . call me pat . , . political science, y y 
ANDREE LUCIENNE PELT, Jripoli, Libya. These aniericans! . . . fantastic warmth under 
sophistication . . . adored by confusingly many . . . dresses par excellence . . . continental eye- 
brow . . . where will home be next? . . . onward ever onward to foreign service . . . intrigue 
. . . himmelboch jauchzend, zum tode betrubt . . . turtleneck tnt . . . snails and dutch gin . . . 
beethoven, Strauss, and glenn miller . . . st. exupery and polisci . . . common habitue . . . short 
snorter . . . hereditary diplomatist . . . international relations, y y KATHRYN JOAN PETER- 
KIN, 7<Jew D'ork, JVeic D'ork. But I put it here somewhere . . . sketching . . . poetry in moments 
of stress . . . new york's a marvelous place . . . another paper to write; I'll walk and think . . . 
quotes for all occasions . . enthusiastic, imaginative . . . insanity tapers off by design . . . 
when I was in africa . . . je m'en fiche . . . bunny . . . english honors, y y JOANNE PIPER, 
Pittsburgh, Tenna. Pick piper for pleasure . . . can be phound in phoenix office, sn, library, 
switchboard, or good humour . . . denies personal problems: I haven't got time to worry about 
that . . . vast fund of unclassified and unclassifiable jokes . . . the trouble with me is that I like 
everybody . . . kneels to the world, but the world is at her feet . . . blond hair, pink cheeks, and 
gigglized wit . . . jo . . . psychology, y y JULIET POPPER, Brooklyn, TJew IVork. Millions of 
interests: nsa, sda, personnel commitee, movie committee, math club, chorus . . . never has time 
but always manages to go to that meeting or get that paper done in that moment of inspiration 
at five a.m. . . . gives psych profs grey hairs with questions . . . driving dynamically toward 
fuller understanding . . . bewildered laugh when things are momentarily out of reach ... all 
night eating binges . . . julie . . . psychology honors. 



chiang-kai-shek rooter 
deserve some sleep . . . 
electrical engineering. 




class of 1953 



RICHARD FREDERICK POTTHOFE, Vrbana, 511. One of, that fast diminishing breed: a 
republican ... he says he's independent . . . e.xact, thorough, and scientific in approach to all 
problems . . . interests: tickling the ivories and grappling with mathematical formulae . . . 
erudite and concise ... an effervescent and adament debater . . . unsquelchable booster of the 
illini . . . midwesterner to the core . . . mathematics honors, y y GORDO.\' WILSON PRATT, 
yiwsdak, JU. Fled from engineering to math and confused ever since . . . that path down crum 
doesn't end at the math library . . . varsity basketball with knock-em-down-and-step-on-em style 
. . . the one with the receded hair line . . . kwink . . . locomotives and graveyards in summer . -. . 
du veep and softball immortal . . . occasional mediocre tennis and billiards efforts . . . ever>' 
inch a student . . . from the hinsdale high . . . bill . . . mathematics, y y EDWARD PRENO- 
W'lTZ, A'eic york, A'eic 3'orfe. Brain, brawn, and brow . . . physics major, female minor -. . . let 
me explain it to you . . . let's go to Chester and get drunk . . . characteristic amble . . . want to 
walk me to the math libe . . . pays social visits to the library . . . veiled statements . . . unveiled 
expletives ... I resent that: doesn't ... 1 have to work: doesn't . . . I'm going to flunk french 
and german: doesn't . . . humble greatness . . . physics honors, y y AMOS C. PRICE, 
Urookhaven, Tenna. Joe miller of phi Sig . . . a million jokes . . . few for mixed company . . . 
infamous serenades . . . painted phi sig lodge while hanging from rafters by heels . . . dreams 

of brownie with the light blue jeans . . . plays mental leapfrog with 

Indian joe . . . gripes about soft hearted John's assignments . . . former 
drexelite . . . honors in greens . . . famous last words: this question is 
ambiguous . . . electrical engineering, y y EMILY RAW'LIX'GS PRICE, 
^Veir Cify, SVeic york. Quiet dignity at all times . . . can spit at least six 
feet . . . friends like her anyway . . . enemies don't ... all I want is a left 
hand comer . . . swears in sleep ... if they want to study they can go 
in the friends' libe ... in ten years it won't make any difference . . . 
I'm broke ... I hate everybody . . . low frustration toleration ... I 
happen to be a psych major . . . psychology honors, y y JOAN ESTHER 
PRICE, IVashington, D.C. Golden heart with devils food topping . . . 
adventures with everything and everybody . . . I'm lonely but ec's such 
fun . . . even keel with flapping sails ... oh, that's great . . . g and s 
. . . Itc . . . prefers student councils . . . we've been here, here, here for 
many a year, year, year . . . friends in every port . . . tea in china . . . 
ac in dc . . . has anyone seen m)' brother? . . . economics honors, y y 
ELLIN NORTH RATCLIFFE, 'Merion, Venna. Crisp brunette with bedroom eyes . . . lives life 
with casual intensity . . . one small minute . . . always that bandbox freshness . . . squeeks when 
she laughs . . . loves to like people . . . but he's so interesting . . . parties, pretzels, and pogo 
. . . why am I still at swarthmore? . . . can't shake the dill pickle habit . . . gwimp . . . every- 
body in my seminar thinks I'm stupid . . . soft-hearted . . . fine arts honors, y y WILLIAM 
OVERINGTON REID, Hirmingham, TtUch. Tall, muscular, breast stroker . . . warm, friendly 
smile . . . how's the boy? . . . enjoys sun bathing but obligations get the best of him . . . nid 
in the making . . . well, after I wrecked my pop's new plymouth . . . extensive traveling in 
europe and the west . . . hidden talent for photography and music . . . sea . . . social committee 
. . . halcyon photographer . . . zoology.^ y y CARL WILLIAM RETTENMEYER, Meriden, 
Conn. Fast long stride with impish grin on top . . . bibliomaniac . . . resident of martin . . . 
asserts authority as frown manufacturer in clothier . . . reported as sadist due to habit of 
sticking pins in insects . . . escapes by writing letters . . . unintentional snob . . . bicycle en- 
thusiast . . . panamaniac . . . clips newspapers . . . passion for filing systems . . . will never be 
a scientist . . . nothing in his filing systems . . . zoology I.iotiors. y y ROSALIND REYDEL, 
loresi yiiUs, \Xew 3'ork. Mischievous spirit beneath breathtaking sophistication . . . born to dwell 
in marble halls . . . iiof what she appears to be . . . believe it or not, a zoo major . . . with a 
respect for chemistr)' . . . roccatorso . . . modem dancing . . . practices unconcernedly . . . the 
eyes have it . . . faultless taste in clothes . . . cheers for the garnet ... a sly, subtle sense of 
humor . . . commons store without pay . . . but profitably . . . zoology, y y DEBORAH ANN 
RICHARDSON, li'yomissing. Venna. Ardent keeper of daily schedules: never lives b\' them . . . 
neit' yorker devotee . . . frustrated traveler . . . someday I'll get past harrisburg . . . penchant 
for people and the unexpected . . . fugitive from holyoke and the ivy league . . . journalistic 
aspirations . . . perennially late with good excuses . . . effervescent enthusiasm . . . the great 
out of doors . . . let's do something fun . . . windblown look, impish grin, infectious giggle . . . 
debbie . . . english. y y JOHN MURRAY RIDLA.N'D, Spokane, 7('(isl.ii)i^toii. British born 
califomian from the pacific northwest . . . travels . . . auto-stop in frarice . . . cycling in england 
. . . likes many things he knows little about: e.g. music, art, Scotland, women . . . tall . . . swims 
. . . amateur but serious poet . . . informal philosopher . . . bursts joy's grape . . . should have 
been an elizabethan . . . who doth ambition shun? . . . loves to live in the sun . . . aims in life 
uncertain . . . english honors. 



class oj 1953 



ROBERT E. RODGERS, Chester, Penna. Remember that old quaker saying . . . plays around 
at lacrosse and football . . . love those fancy vests . . . b-h curve from Chester . . . one time phi 
sig prexy . . . why do I stay at s\varthmore with such creeps . . . dated a swarthmore girl once 
. . . ifc and asme . . . it's a drug store, not a druggie . . . Saturday nite parties used to be fun . . . 
here come the indians . . . bucky . . _. mechanical drawing, y y RICHARD B. ROEDER, 
Schuyikitt yiaven, Penna. Gregarious hermit . . . deaf, dumb, and blind proctor . . . frustrated 
footballer . . . fearless firstsacker wielding a wicked willow . . . titanic tussel for originality in 
seminar papers . . . man (and woman) is the measure of all things . . . meditation, Maizie, 
and Mozart . . . sometime optimist with hesitant hope for the millennium . . . der tandsmann . . . 
philosophy honors, y y DANIEL RUBIN, Philadelphia, Penna. Always willing to expound 
ideas . . . with facts and figures at fingertips . . . great verbal capacity . . . ninety-two page 
paper stumped poli sci professor . . . soup and aerial dives at four a.m. . . . debating team, 
practices with roommates . . . elections committee chairman, you should see what some people 
do to ballots . . . internationally oriented . . . our friend garrity . . . who's' going to the libe . . . 
loud guffaw from otherwise quiet soul . . . political science honors, y y ROGER SALE, 
Ithaca, l^ew 3'ork. Untrained introspectionist . . . unbelievable energy, emotion, imagination, 
and intellect in one scrambled package . . . misunderstood phinx philosoper . . . phi sig and 
smelly cigars . . . relentless poker and erratic bridge ... an insight that 
can make one squirm . . . studies the arts through the eyes of d. h. lawrence 
. . . puppy with mature bark . . . satirical but sensitive,- sloppy but sublime 
. . . what would we do without our rog . . . wait for me, penelope . . . english. 
y y LEW SASSE, Jkcsoii, Arizona. Wandered here from Arizona with 
his own peculiar style . . . unimpressed by most conventions, especially 
concerning women and clothes ... is both unpretentious and unimposing 
yet has definite ideas of his own . . . embarrassing sense of humor . . . 
sure death if taken seriously . . . du . . . lew's blank . . . chemistry, y y 
RAY^40ND SAWYER, Bethlehem, Penna. Logician working in disorgan- 
ized surroundings . . . vacant stares into space . . . chair balancer . . . 
feigning concentration while fighting* sleep in seminar . . . mathematical 
eloquence on the backs of old envelopes . . . year and one half behind in 
lab notebooks and losing ground at rate of one week per week . . . initial 
manner belies genius at disturbing peace . . . god, another foreign movie 
in clothier . . . physics honors, y y HEDI SCHMID, Binghamton, SVeii> york. Old world 
influence . . . penchant for art and artists . . . genuine . . . admittedly domestic . . . piquant 
smile and those eyes . . . elevator moods . . . listen, I have something to tell you . . . halcyon, 
phoenix . . . skiiing and martha's vineyard . . . near future: camp follower . . . fine arts, y y 
JOHN SEARS, Varling, Penna. Barberossa jr . . . in spite of silvering hair . . . family in hiding 
. . . four kids, five cats . . . connoisseur of b.eer, bach, and tobacco . . . mozart from memory on 
parlor piano . . . skeptical philosopher with the semantic touch . . . ready ear for love troubles 
of younger generation . . . heartbreak man for distant female admirers . . . boston accent with 
absolute pitch . . . last-minute rushes on seminar papers . . . chamber music a la schubert . . . you 
positively make me'feel old . . . philosophy honors, y y ILIANA SEMMLER, ll'oodstock, 7'Jew 
york. Freshman here in premed . . . sophomore year for music at oberlin . . . back again as 
junior in poly sci . . . wonder where and what she'll be as senior . . . gives up smoking once a 
day . . . slackers anonymous . . . enthusiastic bridge novice . . . how about a cup of coffee . . . 
hair-do to match mood . . . mock innocent eyes . . . iliana, not diana . . . jonny . . . political 
science, y y iVlINDA RAE SENSIBAR, Chicago, Jllinois. Ethereal look under impish curls . . . 
Chicago ba . . . studying irf commons after midnight . . . the work's not hard, there's just a lot 
of it . . . though the organism is quiet, it may be thinking . . . sensitive and unfailing thought- 
fulness for others . . . inner security . . . psych major with fondness for english . . . speaks with 
literary perfection . . . personalized greeting cards . . . i'm getting so fat . . . psychology honors. 
y y JEAN THOMPSON SHARPLESS, Morrisville, Penna. Original blond bombshell . . . 
tomboy glamour . . . haverford co-ed . . . breezy exuberance . . . philosophical undertones and 
the unexpected . . . eccentric glasses . . . uninhibited humor . . . artistic appreciation . . . 
chanteuse, cheerleader, charlestoner, chorine . . . that flailing arm in hockey and swimming . . . 
may courter . . . zest for living . . . multitude of friends . . . nee thompson . . . english. y y 
JOHN DOWDY SIMON, Wilmington, Dei. Yo, it's sigh-mon ... if smith and soyars want to 
use the chevy, tell 'em it won't start . . . tall, dark, and bashful, but if he only knew . . . gosh, 
with all this work, I'll have to study friday night . . . you lucky bull majors . . . that good ol' 
mountain dew . . . one of the boys . . . bearcats, soccer, lacrosse . . . kwink . . . mec . . . sn 
. . . phi delt . . . one of the nicest guys . . . mechanical engineering. 




class of 1953 



ALANSON B. SMITH, Shaftsbury, Vefmont. Easy-going vemionter . . . radio repairman of 
give it another kick school . . . degenerated mosomorph . . . part owner of college's worst record 
collection . . . I'm not supposed to think, I'm an engineer . . . hill-billy music all night . . . 
overcome by sleep under fantastic circumstances . . . run-ins with the law . . . comic book 
subscriptions . . . rumored to be fired from seven out of eight summer jobs . . . phi delt . . . 
electrical engineering, y y JAMES THOMAS SOYARS, Jlopkinsville, Xentucky. Heaven must 
be a kentucky of a place . . . bearcats, nightfighters, phi delt basketball . . . I've got to get 
some money from libba . . . democrat with a capital d . . . argument by analogy . . . flowery 
eloquence on written exams ... a debater, naturally . . . advocate of waiting till the last minute 
. . . distaste for all authority except when writing papers . . . preparing for a legal career by 
studying criminal law first hand . . . torn . . . history honors, .f y DOUGLAS MURRAY 
SPENCER, Swarthmore, Venna. Conscientious chem major but studies best in prone position 
. . . quick sense of humor . . . erstwhile waterboy for the swimming team . . . every man has 
his faults and honesty is his . . . michigan was never like this . . . local boy makes good . . . 
hardworking du . . . hell, yes . . . druggie dates . . . easy-going with a friendly word for all . . . 
chemistry, y y H. THOMAS STEIN, Amsterdam, Holland. Return gift for marshall plan aid 
; . . the proctor, for he's a jolly good fellloooo . • . gentle simple-minded usher . . . basso 
profudnick . . . tactful understanding of personal problems: I don't like 
you ... I can't go to sleep yet, george isn't home . . . sinterklass with 
amsterdam chocolates . . . fecht, plucht, fecht ... at the racetrack I bet 
costello that number 7 would . . . henry thinks I should play othello, or 
better yet desdemona . . . psychology honors, y y LUCY C. STEIN- 
BACH, 7<!ew york, T^ew Jork. Life among the labs . . . salamanders along 
the crum . . . zoo is really wonderful . . . english, deutsch, francais, espanol 
. . . concert-mistress of the orchestra, chamber music at dr. dresden's, and 
on the spur of the moment, piano in-between . . . calm on the outside, 
sensitive inside . . . individualist . . . conferences with dr. eckler . . . 
happy laugh . . . instinctive understanding of people . . . zoology, y y 
ROBERT O. STEWART, Elwood, Indiana. Born in miss., raised (not too 
high) in buffalo . . . music all the day . . . first tenor for squirrel, phi 
delt chorister, skilled trumpeter, uke for fun ... a sharp eye and a steady 
hand . . . veteran camper and mechanic, artist, future zoologist . . . 
cycles, bow ties, fried chicken are real neat . . . big grin and the easy manner . . . life is beautiful 
and that's a fact . . . pepper . . . zoology, y y LOUISE STOLTZE, St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Another refugee from norristown . . . stringbean in the overactive ward . . . finger in all activities 
. . . chronic knitter with a witch's bag ... all that coffee, yet still she can sleep . . . well 
travelled, but east or west, home is. best. . . . minnesota twang . . . fresh air fiend . . . cold blood 
but warm heart . . . my name is not lesser . . . less . . . history, y y ALICE JEAN STOVER, 
Sharon, Venna. Bounces through campus careers with a smile . . . moans too much to do, too 
little time . . . but always free for tea sans tomes . . . sometime editor, council veep . . . keeps 
track of love life on 3x5 file cards . . . efficiency plus enthusiasm plus quiet brilliance . . . naive, 
though claims to fame remain on finx wall . . . turned up nose . . . mad-hatter merriment only in 
wee hours . . . jay . . . history honors, y y DAGMAR STRANDBERG, Qlenside, Venna. 
Uncanny luck in having situations solve themselves . . . cute pug nose with the little half smile 
. . . that far away look . . . cries only when laughing . . . understands people amazingly well . . . 
wish I'd watch -i the time . . . hockey full-back that might score . . . sailing and suntan at stone 
harbor . . . makes everyone feel so important ... a delightful person . . . history, y y ELIZA- 
BETH ANN SUCKOW, glen Rock, 7<Iew Jersey. A serene redhead ... yet easily enthused 
. . . magnetic attraction to certain massachusetts town . . . yet exiled to glen rock ... in- 
defatigable Sunday school teacher . . . creative . . . subconscious desire to be fine arts major . . . 
oh dear! . . . scf charter member . . . firm convictions but not a prude . . . procrastinator . . . 
sympathetic listener . . . daydreamer . . . beth . . . history, y y DONALD W. SUTHERLAND, 
Sioux Tails, South Dakota. Stern, good-natured yankee from midwest ... a grind without a 
grind's complex . . . practical humour . . . likes coffee that stands up in cup and fights back . . . 
scf . . . phi delt officer . . . debate manager . . . voratious orator with flair for philippic . . . 
former c section barbarian . . . true to a home town gal . . . austere . . . never lost an argument or 
a dare . . . very high ideals . . . bisfory honors, y y JOHN ANDERS SVENNINGSEN, 
Crestwood, l^ew york. The friendly swede: transferred from hamilton . . . the allure of the 
skirts ... I really like history but the homework interferes with college . . . country club athlete 
. . . jv football . . . jv baseball . . . excels at bowling . . . those Swedish girls . . . summers abroad 
. . . going over to see his cousins . . . whose for heartza? . . . history. 



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dassoj \953 



RICHARD CONRAD TAEUBER, University Park, ?ilary\and. Goes places in a hurry . . . 
going places too . . . not sure whether up or down . . . don't work too hard . . . addicted to 
bridge and hearts . . . you chopper, why didn't you lead . . . big shot in super social committee 
. . . dances in squares . . . kwink, sn, Itc, baseball manager . . . listens to hillbilly music and 
arthur godfrey ... i do work sometimes . . . dick . . . economic honors, y / DONALD S. 
TAYER, Brooklyn, SVew Jork. I beg your pahdon . . . science? . . . don't be ridiculous ... the 
rational man . . . equanimity without naivete . . . eyes on the future . . . plans vacations months 
ahead . . . frequents friends' libe, usually to study ... one of Itc's most active members ... in 
search of a virtuous woman . . . inveterate theater-goer . . . you may hear him laughing across a 
crowded room . . . sn's milton cross . . . incurable new yorker . . . starts sneezing halfway 
through lincoln tunnel . . . came to swarthmore for the agrarian outlook . . . psychology honors. 
.f ^ SEAN FAIRCHILD THOMPSON, li'estfield, T^^ew Jersey. Westerner frustrated in 
suburbs . . . thinks he's uncouth . . . intemperate rages at absurdities . . . alternates between 
pleasure and reality principles . . . wonderful ear for language, lower basin street, and chamber 
music . . . politics till three . . . philosophy first intoxication . . . lugged the weiner kreis 
through the wheatfields . . . english inconstantly inviting . . . friends dogmatically praise his wit 
. . . english literature, y y BARBARA TURLINGTON, Chevy Chase, Maryland. Underlying 
belief in the brotherhood of man . . . whole hearted and 'sympathetic 
concern for people . . . quick mind, when the rational side predominates 
. . . comes through admirably at the last minute . . . lack of self discipline 
redeemed by sensitive, sometimes profound feeling . . . pronounced inclina- 
tion toward sunsets, animals and english ballads . . . uwf . . . psychology 
honors. Y -f JAMES VANDER VEEN, Bound Brook, 7ie\c Jersey. Silent 
tending towards aphonia paranoica . . . manager for cross country team 
. . . loyal attender of things sporting and cultural . . . likes to read new 
books but seldom admits it . . . kwinker . . . frequently escapes pressure 
of honors by movies and imbibing in raisins and apricots . . . pinup is a 
dog . . . business manager of hamburg show still looking for row q in 
ciothier . . . cautious conservative . . . chemistry honors. ^ y URSULA 
\'ICTOR, VleasanXviMe, A'en.' 3'ork. Disconcerting child . . . realist who 
achieves the improbable . . . never gives up . . . weeks spent counting 
contractile vacuoles . . . substitutes coffee for sleep, but occasionally 
succumbs in martin . . . fine arts and political science to give liberal arts its due . . . essentially 
peaceable, but reacts violently when irritated . . . demands justice . . . astounds sloppy swarth- 
more by dressing with distinction . . . ultramodern room decor, including comp anat relics . . . 
novel notion . . . ursi . . . biology honors, y y ROBERT A. WALKLING, '^ala-Cymvyd, Venna. 
Slight figure with energy . . . have to finish lab early, i got a date . . . holds band together ... a 
moment of silence in scf . . . phil, oh foo . . . bassoonist extra-ordinary . . . ompa-omp . . . this 
need is no good . . . phi delt piano player . . . don't know where all my time goes . . . eats 
slowly . . . passionate over spike jones, philly orchestra . . . women . . . bob . . . physics honors. 
y y ELEANOR WALLIS, Lewisburg, West Virginia. Generous . . . duo-national, expressible 
only by paradoxes: complicated-simplicity, closed-openness, naive- wisdom . . .nurtures an un- 
resolved creativity . . . responsive to art, literature, music, warmth . . . not quite sure she's in 
the right world ; . . the wide eyed listener hides the doubting soul . . . muffy . . . english. y y 
CHARLES B. W'ARDE.N', JR., Bethesda, Maryland. Now when i was in europe . . . still wears a 
coat and tie . . . bridge nine to twelve . '. . cherchez la femme ... let me tell you the 
difference between the german, english and french girls ... oh, conversation our forgotten art 
. . . french major who barely passed french three . . . paris made the differenc . . . chick . . . 
french. y y ROBERT CLARK WENTWORTH, Baltimore, Maryland. One of the original 
hackers . . . physicist, but a tennis bum at heart . . . dabbles in badminton, ping pong . . . this 
stuff is really tough . . . devoted to bridge . . . sometimes chess, hearts . . . once got into 
sda, uwf, debating team . . . now philosophizes occasionally . . . let's fudge those figures, i got 
to get out of here . . . havta hurry, got a date five minutes ago . . . loves loafing, women . . . 
bob . . . physics, y y ELIZABETH^BIAYS WILKENS, Haltimore, Maryland. Chronic leaper 
. . . what a true unfortunate . . . would be intellectual, but being a knit-wit is easier . . . from the 
heights to the depths in one sentence . . . il y a toujours quelque damm chose . . . bathtub admiral 
. . . much too familiar with strange cats . . . dreadful puns . . . tries to convince friends of her 
basic seriousness . . . betsy . . . french. y y NINA WILLIAMS, T^ew D'ork, SVeii' 3'ork. Infinite 
interest span . . . almost infinite achievements . . . arch defender of what she believes in but still 
isn't sure of what it is, exactly . . . hyper-actively organizational . . . pulls ninety-eight strings 
... 88 piano, 6 guitar, and 4 cello . . . on ne voit bien qu'avec le coeur. I'essential est invisible 
pour les yeux . . . product of progressive education,- learns by doing . . . history honors. 



:lassoj 1953 



MARY JANE WINDE, "Wilmington, Del. Amiability, afFability, plus . . . sports, student govern- 
ment ... is there anything she can't do . . . future president of the p.t.a. . . . practical, but hates 
the word efficiency . . . silly streak and gleeful giggle . . . stokes and I . . . those field zoo trips 
. . . swarthmore rarity; no great idiosyncracies . . . du sister . . . the sympathetic ear . . . poise 
and assurance . . . windy . . . zoology, y / ELLEN WlNKELSTElN, T^ew york, Tiew york. 
Impatient with the trivial . . . but what is most important . . . still trying to improve the world . . . 
uproarious laugh . . . quizzical look . . . outlet in music ... I might be a little late . . . perpetual 
magnifier . . . but what's more important than people . . . nibbles continually yet room for 
pizzas . . . always can find time for bull sessions . . . and other people's problems . . . want to 
go to the drCiggie . . . winky . . . psychology, y y PEGGY ANN WOFORD, Danville, Xentucky. 
Friendliness personified . . . warm smile .for everyone . . . blonde hair and southern accent . . . 
hah, not hi . . . pre-med with five labs and time for varsity sports too . . . does a semester's work 
in one night when pressed . . . brilliant but won't admit it . . . lab artist . . . three loves: the south, 
palmer, and bobby . . . levis and hoagies . . . those inimitable puns . . . modest, sincere, and 
easy-going . . . invaluable friend . . . zoology, y y JEANNE WOLFRAM, San Jrancisco, Calif. 
Inquiring eye . . . always asking why . . . what good will it do . . . elaborate systems . . . but 
I knooow it doesn't always work . . . peculiar schedules . . . contented honors student . . .waiting 
on tables . . . molasses in milk . . . intellectual, but honest . . . but I'm still growing . . . people 
with a small p . . . ready to talk, except when a paper's due in an hour . . . former sn di-staff 
. . . archery . . . hambo . . . woofie . . . english honors, y y JOHN WORLOCK, "Kearney, 
"T^ebraska. Cool, clear nebrasky sense . . . don't git riled up ... a good life is an intelligent 
balance . . . the clarity of mathematics, the beauty of good building, the responsibility to your 
neighbor, the joy in music and a hundred other things ... as a future architect, sensible, 
resourceful, to the point . . . summers at work and in the rockies . . . baritone in bancroft's 
barber shop . . . slow drawl and quick humor . . . imagine . . . not telling . . . squirrel . . . 
mathematics, y y ROGER J. YOUMAN, Weic york, T^ew york. The old sloth . . . amused 
spectator of the passing scene . . . swarthmore: who needs it . . . intellectual of the sports world 
. . . straight a's in jazz appreciation . . . sang-froid sarcasm . . . never lets work interfere with 
his pleasure ... to Chester for the flicks and some brews . . . there's a humorous side to every 
situation . . . jv, garnet club, and slothtrotter hoopster . . . deathless prose as old angus . . . rog 
. . . english. 



traditional junior dilemna 
honors versus course 






class of 1953 



John Worlock 

preside)it 

Mary Jane Winde 

vice-preside}U 

Jay Stover 

secretary 

Mel Hintz 

treasurer 



MARY ETHEL BULL, Savannah, Qeorgia. That full schedule ... so casually followed 
I'll be on time tomorrow, I promise . . . friday trips for a different supper ... and a crowd to 
go with her . . . favorite position: on the floor with tisket . . . staying awake in class is physically 
impossible . . . sympathetic listener when you need one . . . savannah men are so much fun . . . 
milk by the gallon . . . contagious enthusiasm . . . tisket, come . . . Spanish. 



'^'fT'^fi 




CLASS OF 1953 



CLASS OF 1953 





Back row, left to right: Hopfield . . . Carle . . . Allina . . . Heistercamp . . . Rorer 
. . . Van Pelt . . . Purnell . . . Richter . . . Carter . . . Snyder . . . Dennison 
. . . Bruch . . . Rogers . . . Sternberg . . . Thompson . . . Togosaki: fifth row. 
Head . . . Bart . . . Bryson . . . Soyers . . . McGonagle . . . Walker . . . Kahlen- 
berg . . . Dun: fourth row, Steiner . . . Kolb . . . Navasky . . . Levin . . . Gatchell 
. . . Eronini . . . Bradley . . . Silver . . . Thorn . . . Lenrow: third row, Turner 
. . . Webster . . . Fuller . . . Brown . . . Voysey . . . Nichol . . . Hill . . . Brock 
. . . Hay . . . Turner . . . Slinghoff . . . Lyman: second row, Bevier . . . Barrera 
. . . Marx . . . Kesten . . . Brown . . . Manson: first row. Sturgeon . . . Weil . . . 
Lichtman . . . Lippitt . . . Starfield . . . Kissling . . . D'Emilio . . . Donow. 



CLASS OF 1954 



Back How, left to right: Cornelius . . . Maris . . . Lang . . . Lowen . . . Freeman 
. . . Bodin: fifth rotf,- Reeves . . . White . . . Cooper . . . Rubenstein . . . Lane 
. . . Beker . . . Kennedy . . . Houston: fourth row, Greene . . . Harris . . . 
. . . Cummings . . . Strauss . . . Kantrowitz . . . Laux . . . Holloway . . . Davis: 
third row, Riley . . . Schilling . > . Fanning . . . Mangels . . . DeWitt . . . Van 
Tassel . . . Nugen . . . Wren . . . Dawson . . . Andrews . . . Rhoads . . . Smith: 
second row, Irish . . . Morrow . . . Welch . . . Ore . . . Peatman . . . Young . . . 
Lemke: first row, Thomas . . . Smith . . . Jacobson . . . Shimony . . . Brigham . . . 
Tissot . . . Evans . . . Bopp . . . Wilson. 




r43^ 



SiSSSSS^H 



'■Ut*. 



CLASS OF 1954 




■trsr * iirf-ri/f- 





CLASS OFFICERS 

Abernethy . . . secretary 
Bode . . . vice-preside)it 
Sieverts .... president 
Hunter .... treasurer 



CLASS OF 1955 





CLASS OF 1955 



^'^'^■RO 




pi' K''''^" "?'>*' 








Student council, fait . . 
. . . Commins . . . Burn 
J. Price . . . Sutton . . 
Landeck. 



back row . . . Willmott . . . Valsing 
. . Hummer; front row . . . Mottur 
Green, president . . . Stover . . . 



Student council, spring . . . hack row . . . Peet . . . Bum 
Sasse . . . Sutton, president, second row . . . Blake . . . 
Harris . . . Worlock . . . Green; first row ... P. Price . . . 
Mott . . . Stover . . . Hintz. 



^nolber petition? 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



Student committees no longer in oblivion . . . curriculum committee 
initiates student advising system . . . Advisors pass on experience, 
knowledge of student viewpoint, class notes . . . free university 
committee continues interchange of students, correspondence, infor- 
mation . . . newly-formed committee on national and international 
affairs assumes responsibility for nsa relations, weltanshauung . . . 
commons committee achieves the impossible, changes jukebox records 
regularly, provides reading nook, cartoon collections . . . chinese 
checkers offers opportunity for non-intellectual indoor athletes . . . 
budget committee continually busy . . . box outside dining room a 
familiar sight . . . referenda ad nauseum . . . whether to abolish frater- 
nities, the student council, all referenda ... a hundred people sign a 
petition and goodie! we have an issue . . . fraternity question brings 
student and faculty debates before student council, public forums . . . 
ifc goes into action . . . forms new alumni student continuity group 
. . . results pacified alarmed alumni: two to one for status quo . . . 
break with national tentatively recommended, improvement of social 
facilities definitely recommended . . . budget dictates status quo here 
. . . student council survives smiling somehow . . . 
Burning isues blaze hotter and last longer in smoke-filled lodge six . . . 
faithfully every Sunday night . . . year of controversy and lodges 
crammed with visitors . . . year of referenda and commons forums . . . 
year of increasing stature and maturity of student council . . . 




New student advisory program in action 




Iree university . . . standing . . . Bunzl . . . Brubaker . . . 
Stover . . . Purnell . . . Cohn . . . Hathcock . . . Williams 
. . . Alden; sitting . . . Brade . . . Honig . . . Murray . . . 
MacMahon 



'Mational and international affairs . . . Cohn . . . Navasky . . . 
Sieverts . . . Stover . . . Sher . . . Williams . . . deRudder. 



Curricidum . . . back row . . . Thimann . . . Willmott 
Cohn; front row . . . Sher . . . Bellow . . . Obermayer 
L. Maurer. 




y*'^jr->= 



Stude}it affairs. 



Elections . . . Hathcock . . . Mott . . . Alden 
Van Pelt . . . Blatchford 



Rubin 




7ALL . . . standing . . . Don . . . Boden . . . Murray ... P. Hall . . . Keay 
. . . Bond . . . Shepherd; second row . . . Ames . . .Winde . . . Steiner . . . 
Commins, president . . . Hand . . . Miller . . . MacMillan . . . Bellow; first 
row . . . Burnett . . . Cliffe . . . Hintz . . . Shepherd . . . Hay. 




li'SQA, activities . . . Hutcheson . . . Bond . . 
Kisslina . . . Starfield . . . Graham . . . McDowell 



WSGA 




SPRITE g . . . back row . . . Wolfe . . . Bull . . . Abernethy ... J. Lee ... A. 
Smith . . . Woford . . . Olsen . . . Bradley . . . R. Smith . . . McKee . . . 
Andrews, front row . . . MacMillan . . . Passoth . . . Mott, president . . . Gatchell 
. . . Likert . . . Winde . . . Graham. 



IVSQA, somerville . . . back row . . .Lickert . . . 
Murphey . . . Turner . . . R. Maurer . . . White; 
second row . . . Winde . . , Kahlenburg . . Hall; 
first roil? . . . Abernethy ... J. Hand . . . Andrews 
. . . Tai , . . Wren. 




WSQA, coiuiiict . . . standing . . . Erb . . . Lee 
. . . MacMillan; seated . . . Kahlenberg . . . 
Chantler . . . Donow . . . Eagle . . . S. Hand. 



MEC 



. . . back row . . . Landeck, president . . . 
Simon . . . Gump; front roin . . . Rosecrance 
. . . Chang. 



MJC 



Paterson . 
Jeanne. 



Hill . . . Burn . . . Landeck 



PROCTORS 



standing . . . Sasse . . . .Green . . . Sher . . . 
Roeder . . . Finkel . . . Gaston . . . Sutton,- seated 
. . . Seaman. I)ead proctor . . . Valsing. 



IFC 



back row, Thomas, president oj kappa sictma . . . 
Swartout, president of phi delta theta . . . Harris 
. . . Lloyd-Jones . . . Sutton, president of phi 
kappa psi. . . . Sasse, president of delta upsilon: 
front row, Sale . . . Wright . . . R. Kyle . . . 
Peet, president of the council . . . Clark . . . Frost: 
not pictured, Fitts, president of phi sigma kappa. 




this is no club ! 




ENGINEERS CLUB 



Officers . . . Smucker . 
shenker . . .Porter. 



Mangelsdorf . . . Wein- 



"ME," "CE," "EE" ... in one organi- 
zation . . . automatic membership . . . 
frequent but irregular meetings . . . some- 
times a speaker . . . hey, there's a hole 
in the budget ... no funds . . . dangles- 
morf has the answer . . . 

7he annual christmas party ... an old 
fashioned affair . . . skits, carol singing, 
gifts, and personalized diplomas for the 
seniors . . . prettier than the real ones . . . 
The engineers picnic . . . nearest thing to 
a Sunday school picnic possible . . . me 
and ce vs ee softball . . . game called 
after five innings because of food . . . 

Next fall it's the big snow . . . the biennial 
open house . . . invitations to industrial 
leaders and parents ... a special welcome 
to the whole faculty and student body 
... to come see our pride and joy . . . 
the mysteries of beardsley and hicks . . . 
home of the slip-stick carrying swarth- 
more engineer . . . 





KAPPA 
SIGMA 



Back row . . . Broderick . . . T. Jones . . . Lowen . . . Thomas . . . Wright . . . Baker . . . S. Clark; 
second row . . . Nicolai . . . White . . . Oaki . . . Baumgarten . . . Raymond. 








^I^F '^ ^^^^^^^1 


»/'"i^ 




- ■ i 


u 


.- ■ 



PHI 
DELTA 
THETA 





£■ ■* 





Standing . . . Walkling . . . Calvin . . . Harris . . . Kennedy ... J. Smith . . . Simon 

. . . Soyars . . . Henderson . . . Heath . . . Pearson . . . Burgess; seated . . . Porter . . . 

Peet . . . Morgan . . . Swartout . . . Armbruster . . . Fetter . . . Newitt. 




Back row . . . Heaton . . . Brogden . . . Brade . . . Lau.K . . . Hawkins . . . Spragg 

. . . Suter . . . Robinson . . . Handley . . . S. Cooper . . . G. Smith; second roio . . . 

Gump . . . Myers . . . Douglas . . . Darlington . . . Sutherland . . . Shepard; front 

row . . . Hutton . . . Laws . . . Strachan . . . Webb . . . Davis. 




Back row . . . Sharpless . . . Bode . . . Ingebritsen . . . Hoffmann . . . Frank 
. . . Simkin . . . M. Jones ; third row . . . Ludwig-. . . Howell . . . Tomlinson 
. . . Schmitz . . . Pratt . . , Frost . . . E. Wallach . . . Lamb . . . Thorn . . . 
Heagle; second row . . . Griest . . . HoUoway . . . Spencer . . . Sasse . . . F. 
Kyle . . . Lucht . . . Owen . . . Seaman . . . Waterfield; first row . . . Burtis 
. . . Tom Preston . . . Phillips . . . Ted Preston . . . Yag . . . R. Kyle. 

DELTA UPSILON 






Back roii; . . . Coss . . . Martindale . . . Meyer . . . Wilkinson . . . Ochroch . . . Friedericy 
. . . Harris . . . Allen . . . White . . . Fristrom . . . Dettmers; third row . . . Swayne . . . 
Gabel . . . Warden . . . Cornell . . . Kohls , . . Blake , . . W. Jones; second row . . . 
Lloyd-Jones . . . Sutton . . . Woodrow; first row . . . Levine . . . Merin . . . Riley . . . Carroll 

. . . Schilling. 



PHI 

KAPPA 

PSI 





Back row . . . Hughlett . . . Becker . . . Forsythe . . . Rodgers . . . Gallagher 
. . . Woodbury; front row . . . R. Smith . . . Heistercamp . . . Fitts . . . Ross 

. . . Sale. 



PHI 
SIGMA 
KAPPA 




Swarthmore's back-to-nature movement, mother 
nature permitting . . . canoe trips on the rancocas 
and great egg harbor rivers — "bottoms up" . . . 
pack trips to hawk mountain and along the 
appalachian trail — "what's this green thing in my 
sleeping bag?" . . . cave exploring and Ginny 
stuck half in, half out . . . John Simon's can an 
honorary member . . . mechanized wsga hayride, 
gerry's car supplying horsepower . . . bicycle trip 
with penn to valley forge — what goes down (hill) 
must go 1^5 (hill) . . . foo to mother nature with 
indoor bowling, roller skating and swimming, and 
planetarium stargazing . . . dozens of constitu- 
tions and one dirty song till the advent of pete 
calingaert's clean-up squad . . . now one set of 
rules and no dirty song . . . what can you do? 
. . . ca-oo-wah . . . 



OUTING 
CLUB 



■T^:^M^^fi^^'^* ' '^ •"■.'*** 




Back row . . . David . . . Carle . . . Schmitz . . . Roberts ... P. Calingaert . . . 
M. Calingaert . . . Rorer . . . Reid . . . Perkins . . . Harrington . . . Van Pelt; 
third row . . . Withrow . . . Bryson,- second row . . . Weller . . . Foulger . . . 
Taeuber . . . Fines . . .Mangelsdorf . . . S. Mills,- first row . . . Hay . . . Stevenson 
. . . Wren . . . Andrews. 





Behind dili-daU, h rive gauche and much, much 
more . . . roccatorso . . . lodge one . . . Friday 
night open houses . . . the social committee . . . 
a functioning and expanding concern -in a year 
of social facility soul searching . . . headed in the 
fall by dick toyber and romo foulger, in spring 
by anne fines and fred mangelsdorf . . . always 
before the public eye, thanks to maris' sprightly 
signwork . . . always behind campus weekend 
affairs, thanks to little realized efforts of the large 
staff . . . they alone know how much work makes 
for our play . . . and how many different kinds of 
play we require . . . 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE 




1 RACE RELATIONS 

1 

Jlace Hetations ■. standing . . . Fine . . . C. Cooper . . . Pur- 
1 nell . . . Rubin . . . Rubinstein : sealed . . . Watson . . . C. 
5 Johnson . . . Scurlock, co-chairman . . . Speier . . . Heis- 

tercamp, co-chairman . . . Keating . . . Moltz. 



DEBATE GROUP 

Debate group: standing . . . Rowe . . . Hattis . . . 
Sutherland, treasurer . . . T. Soyars : seated . . . Hodg- 
son . . . Armstrong, president . . . L. Soyars . . . Pearson. 



SDA 




SDA: standing ... . Temin . . . Keighton . . . C. Smith . . . B. 
Harris . . . Baumgarten . . . Marcus : sealed . . . Christenson 
. . . Darlington, publicity . . . Altman, treasurer . . . Keating, 
president . . . Bunker, secretary . . . Ellenbogen. 




. . . introduced to the campus in February ... a 
sizable group of enthusiastic students working 
toward better east-west relations . . . soon became 
a sizable group of students working on a non- 
partisan basis for better understanding between 
the countries of the world . . . program included 
this year lectures, discussions, petitions . . . and 
a new bulletin board on which were posted rele- 
vant current happenings . . . mel hintz served as 
chairman for the term. . . . 



. . . the main group on campus de- 
voting itself to discussion of inter- 
national affairs ... at meetings . . . 
at spaghetti suppers by schiller . . . 
with speakers . . . with friends . . . 
with enemies ... an information 
group rather than a political action 
one . . . meetings designed to clarify, 
not convert . . . overall goal of in- 
creasing international understand- 
ing . . . chairmen ralph brown and 
nina Williams do the dirty work, 
from notice sending to being polite 
to speakers to drying dishes. . . . 



IRC 




EAST -WEST 




ICG 



Intercollegiate conference on gov- 
ernment, the mock politicos . . . 
sponsored campus presidential poll 
... ike won . . . duff invited to speak 
for him . . . boss valsing unable to 
hold delegation in line at.bryn mawr 
convention, lost to Stevenson forces 
... at harrisburg was hit by a steam- 
roller in his attempt to pull down a 
political plum, the speakership . . . 
delegation again split, Stevenson 
winning a close battle . . . stalwarts 
took a glorious defeat on all counts 
. . . staunch leaders : boss d. charles 
(buddha) valsing esq. and brice 
harris, secretary . . . wait till next 
year. . . . 



MUSIC 




scenes at orchestra rehearsal, van de kamp on 
the podium . . . 





the spur 0/ the moment at Christmas collection . 



a portion 0/ the cuttinc! keyholders 





I iceekh chamber music meet ipith dresden 




ivednesday night brought direction to would be sculptors in trotter basement west 





the math club was headed by Commins and li'olff . 



the print club by 7aylor, Pierce and Bodansky 




while foreign students improved their english under 
Mrs. Hall's guidance . . . 




Back row . . . Janet Scantlebury, director . . . McGonagle . . . Bradley . . . 
Wilcox . . . M. Turner . . . C. Lyman; second row . . . Lippit . . . Felber 



Young . . . Heilveil . 

. . . Jacobson. . . Weil 



. R. Maurer; first row 
Bodansky. 



Frank 



MODERN DANCE 



. . . what begins as a gym class . . . ends as an 
improvised flourish at the annual open house . . . 
comers bring the music, the group works from 
there . . . seniors wilcox, woolf and frank, along 
with director scantlebury, assist group in sliding 
out of somerville onto hamburg stage and may 
day platform . . . where full-blown dances sud- 
denly emerge from four o'clock practice gym 
flops ... all in all the end is culture . . . 



Wolff 




FRENCH CLUB 

passez-moi le salt, s'il vons plait . . . 




Back row ... J. Mills ... A. Curtis . . . 
Greene, secretary: second row . . . Cum- 
mings, treasurer . . . Weil . . . Reeves: 
/roil! row . . . Gilbert . . . Bomar . . . Ross 
. . . Emrich, vice-presideyil . . . North: 
not pichired. . . . Harris, presidejil. 



SPANISH 
CLUB 



JEWISH STUDY GROUP 

Back row . . . Goodfriend . . . D. Lewin . . . Lande; front 
row . . . Shimony . . . Popky . . . Lieberman . . . Grossman. 





Standi>ig . . . SlinghofF . . Carraday . . . Krivobok: seated . . . Salas . . . 
Gutt . . . Fleming . . . Mills . . . Farrell . . . Wilcox . . . Riley, chairma}i. 



CANTERBURY CLUB 



SCA 



. . . about to reaffiliate with the 
national student christian move- 
ment after a year's lapse . . . 
membership always changing but 
. . . probably now a liberal chris- 
tian organization . . . retreats, 
lectures, discussions . . . lots of 
talk . . . work camps (we also 
paint, plaster, and remove lino- 
leum) . . . 



)ack row . . . Jacobson, co-chairman . . . Roeder . . . Ross . . . 

'urnell . . . L. Potter, treasurer . . . D. Potter . . . speaker: second 

ow . . . Newell . . . Snyder . . . speaker . . . Elliot ... A. Smith 
. . Crawford . . . Hintz . . . Reid: jront row . . . Triggs . . . Cliffe 
. . Rose . . . McKee . . . S. Smith, secretary: not pictured . . . 

•Jolde. co-chairman. 




SCF 



. . . local chapter of the inter var- 
sity christian fellowship ... re- 
markable recent growth . . . 
young and vigorous . . . midweek 
prayer meetings and bible study 
. . . spearheaded in movement to 
have cooperation among campus 
christian groups . . . 



. . . group of episcopalian stu- 
dents . . . meets at the local 
church . . . group also includes 
townspeople of college age . . . 
promising contributor to the 
episcopal clergy . . . 

Standing . . . Fines . . . Robinson . . 
Suckow; sitting . . . Chang , . . Edsall . . 



Roberts . . . Dawson 
. Bull . . . Edsall. 





Back row . . . Walkling . . . Pearson . . . Hodgson . . . Gibbons 
. . . Woodcock . . . Sutherland . . . Forsythe . . . Suckow . . . 
Waddington . . . Togasaki; second row . . . Wolfe . . . Durant 
. . . Brunner . . . Mawson . . . Kissling; third row . . . Bliss . . . 
Detwiler . . . Hearst . . . Bond. 



Mangels . . . Mills . . . L. Potter . . . Kesten 
Barrera . . . Hicks . . . music. 




Always on the air .. . . wait'll the fee hears about that 
program! . . . sorry, listeners, we're having technical dif- 
ficulties again . . . yawn patrol announcer's theme : as far 
as that program is concerned, I should 'a stayed in bed, 
and 1 did . . . this is the swarthmore radio network . . . 
hey, chuck, is this mike on? it is? . . . and here's our first 
request for the commons show this evening ... if we do 
that as an on-the-spot broadcast, there won't be any 
audience showing up at .the live program . . . dial 380, 
we'll be glad to listen to your tale of woe . . . sn . . . 
kamman's druggie in the ville . . . jim Cornelius is the sta- 
tion manager . . . no, derudder and beatson are assistant 
station managers . . . hey, heisterkamp, you're chief engi- 
neer — who's engineering this show? . . . let's hope that 
pete bart, chief announcer, didn't hear that flub . . . tell 
it to jensh, he's program director . . , jane boetcher is 
publicity . . . sorry, folks, as soon as geoff watts, our tech 
dep't head, gets up to the studios, we can get the program 
under way . . . jane hicks has the sn key to cutting . . . 
calingaert and scurlock, our recording directors . . . yes, 
ambruster is responsible for special events . . . those studio 
managers have their troubles, all of them: cowell, free- 
man, harris, waterson and kahn . . . other people work at 
sn, too . . . you mean you really listened? . . . gosh! . . . 



Kamman . . . Carter . . . Heistercamp 
Bart . . . Mills . . . C. Smith . . . sports. 



Beatson . . . deRudder 
. . . wheels. 



Gumnit , 



Comeilus 



WSRN 



Mangels . . . F. Breckenridge . . . Scurlock . . . 
Fleming . . . Gatchell . . . Turner . . . engineering, 



Hastings . . . Calingaert . . . recording 




Carter . . . Watts . 


. David . 


, Cornelius 


Conrow . 


. . Murray 


. . Ross . . 


. Kahn 


. . . technics. 






Berry . . 


. Cowell . . 


Okazaki . 


. . Bart 



announcing. 



SERVICE ACTIVITIES 




Leaders in college and community 
service . . . Stoltze . . . Hintz . . . 
Keay . . . Mott . . . Fine: not pic- 
tured . . . Morey ... P. Taylor. 



Friday: unit meeting at madi- 
son's house ... to plan for next 
year, evaluate last ... see ex-unit 
members from haverford, chey- 
ney, bryn mawr . . . Saturday: 
the drive to the hospital . . . 
walk a couple of hours with the 
patients . . . talk to old friends, 
new ones . . . christmas: out to 
norristown for caroling and par- 
tying . . . next summer: the unit 
goes to the hospital every day. 

NORRISTOWN 




LANSDOWNE 



One dozen refugees from behind the academic 
curtain escape into a world of juvenile anarchists 
. . . broken windows and energy without end . . . 
creative masterpieces — culinary, artistic, and 
other . . . cooperative play? . . . our constructive 
side . . . christmas pageant — miraculous trans- 
formation . . . shining angels, cherubic choristers 
. . . crepe paper by the mile . . . demon knitters, 
checker champions . . . baseball, jump rope, hop- 
scotch, baby-in-the-air . . . monday night basket- 
ball — interboro coasters vs the woodie chucks 
. . . swarthmore femmes twice victorious over the 
coasterettes . . . kindergarten chairs fashioned 
into percussion instruments — jam session extraor- 
dinaire . . . novel mode of locomotion — mrs. 
dark's typewriter table with speeds up to 600 
mph ... an afternoon's verdict — mad, but mem- 
orable . . . 



Standing . . . R. R. Taylor . . . Moltz . . . Willison . . . 
M. Hill . . . Ridland, spring editor . . . Sher . . . M. Miller 
. . . Johnson . . . Bart; sitting . . . Speier . . . E. Price . . . 
McGrayne, fall editor . . . Ephron. 



DODO 



^- -->^ssxws?«c;.-.; j;iS>v.'-- ;7; ; - > 




The Dodo continues existence 
despite rumors of competition, 
extinction ... it must be organ- 
ized, but how? . . . maintained 
blindfolded editorial policy . . . 
"we print anything" — almost . . . 
what does it mean? • • • deadline 
extended ... it sound nice . . . 
is it art? . . . one-act verse play, 
stories, poetry centest winaers 
. . . business by lippit . . . "would 
you like to advertise in the 
swarthmore college literary mag- 
azine?" . . . what we need is a 
stunt: margie, you jump off- 
clothier ... at swarthmore nearly everybody buys the dodo . . . but do they read 
it? ... "I have a poem here I wrote and I was wondering if you had room . . ." 
. . . editors mcgrayne (winter), ridland (spring) . . . 



The lit . . . esmerian's brainstorm, and swarthmore's newest literary en- 
deavor . . . young, proud, and esoteric . . . and do we love it! . . . "we're 
not really trying to run the dodo into the ground, but if we can get our 
ads early next fall" . . . tremen- 
dous enthusiasm and the paternal 
backing of mr. march . . . "ed, I 
don't care how much space we 
have — it has to be good writing." 
. . . great excitement over first 
printed edition . . . eight-man 
editorial board : davidson, krivo- 
bok, esmerian, march, eagle, 
worth, van tassel, and helene 
smith to handle the business . . . 
only ten cents a copy, and 
eighty-five cents ahead! . . . 
glowing hopes, and plans for 
future expansion . . . 



LIT 




Esmerian . . . Worth . . . March . . . Krivobok . . . David- 



son 



. Eagle. 



Irish . . . Sullivan's back . . . Moltz . . . Bart 
. . . Levin. 



aVs?. i "' 



PHOENIX 




Arizona's phoenix is sunny; swarthmore's phoenix is sinny . . . 
the sinny c^ua non of swarthmore life . . . waterfield (thesis) 
vs navasky (antithesis) . . . result: sin (thesis) . . . motto taken 
from wall : all the news that fits we print . . . sensational series of 
exposes includes . . . fraternity harangue . . . kappa sig national 
president objected to designation of lodge as "den of iniquity" . . . 
what the hey is nsa? . . . closed doors, closed minds . . . entire 
phoenix staff visited student council to avoid getting axe — suc- 
ceeded . . . levin and soyars pay visit to "lord jim's" radio program 
in Chester to divulge the inside story on flnx . . . letters to editor 
column resembles expanding balloon . . . balloon finally bursts as 
pin is applied by nine students over faculty play controversy . . . 
april fooFs issue highlights adolph "the clipper" rubin, causes close 
shave financially . . . liabilities exceed assets before last issue goes 
to press . . . piper pressures budget committee into funds for final 
four-page job . . . oski holds threat of departure from ranks as 
weapon for inclusion of pornography . . . old angus bows to young 
fungus . . . finx answers question "swarthmore women?" . . . yes! 
with reservations . . . no! with illustrations . . . sacrifices vague con- 
cept of "good taste" for empirically verifiable reader-interest . . . 
implicit answer to criticism that paper must be constructed with 
alumni in mind : alums read it because undergrads write it . . . 







aySto 

...bo 



Snel 



Sieverts . . . Levine. 



Navasky- Waterfield, editor-in-chief — Spring. 







Soyars . . . Navasky . . . McKee . . . Oski 
Wolff, editor-in-chief— Tall. 



Business staff . . . Hawkins . . . Kudo . . . Lefke 
. . . Riley . . . Piper, business manager. 



Ridge . . . Waterfield ... Van Pelt . . . Rorer 
. . . Purnell. 



The edit board meets every Sunday at four 



... the best way to advertise and the best way to 
sell . . . Smith, advertising manager . . . Marx, 
sales manager. 



. . . only a misleading pose . . . Hutcheson 
Richardson, junior dass . . . R. Maurer. 



. . . when the office moved to parrish lawn 
Chris'-nsen . . . Moltz, general scapegoat . 
Speier . . . Graham. 



. . . ibey got paid . . . Reid . . . Calingaert . 
Hayward . . . also Seaman, Taylor, Cislak. 




HALCYON 



A few words at the end . . . credits to 
the patient publisher, to the impatient 
staff ... to the work of victor, oski, 
cigarettes, moltz, coffee, marx, smith, 
gin and van tassel in the heat of the last 
minute rush ... to the misses jones of 
the freshman class, all of whom were 
happily eradicated in the galleys . . . 
to Johnson, martin, miller, stover and 
graham for sticking out the pre-xmas 
flood in parrish basement ... to the 
typewriters stolen from the f)boeii)x . . . 
to those no one will ever hear of, but 
who helped ... to that beerparty which 
proved illusory, but which sparked the 
staff for a semester ... to the books, 
which balanced under brigham ... to 
people for buying this book ... to 
davidson . . . and finally to the tension 
which no one ever felt until they could 
sit back and say, my god, it's finished 
. . . and so it was . . . novschmozkapop. 



. . ."here it is June 10 and still no varsity soccer 
photo". . . Miller, design . . . C. Johnson, copy 
. . . Victor, photography . 



ty^CM?/ 



"what are we going to do about the deficit?". . . 
Brigham, business manager . . . Davidson, editor- 
in chief. 




venus and other general helpers . . . Shimony 
. Kudo . . . Pierce. 




Distortions are fun! 



Unification 

Under 

The Comet Plan 



service 

planning 

design 

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binding 



. . . but a good college annual must reflect 

a true picture of the tempo, activities and life 

of each individual campus and class. 

Capturing this atmosphere in plan and design 

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has made Comet a leading producer of fine annuals * 

for more than three decades. 



Tlie Comet Press, Inc. 



200 VARICK STREET, NEW YORK 14 WAtkins 4-6700 



such as this 1953 Halcyon 



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DODGE - PLYMOUTH AGENCY 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 



MARIE DONNELLY 

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104 PARK AVENUE 
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CYRUS WM. RICE & CO., Inc. 

Established 1916 

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EDWARD L. NOYES & CO. 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

23 S. CHESTER ROAD 
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Phone, SWarthmore 6-2350 



CELIA SHOE SHOP 

102 PARK AVENUE 

FINEST IN SHOE REPAIR 
Serving Students Since 1904 



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LETTERHEADS 
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The nexf time you are In 
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Hilltop 6-4501 Sherwood 7-8633 



SWARTHMORE NATIONAL BANK 
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Offers A Complete Banking Service 



STUDENTS ACCOUNTS INVITED 



MEMBER, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



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CLASS OF '53 



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Established 1881 Incorporated 1925 



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General Insurance 



Associated 



Marshall P. Sullivan, '97 Francis W. D'Olier, '07 



324 WALNUT STREET Philadelphia, Pa. 



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MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN 

Chairman of +he Board 

RUSSELL BLEAKLEY 

President 



FRANCIS W. D'OLIER, Treasurer 
RUSSELL BLEAKLEY, JR., Ass't. Sec'y. 



LEO C. HAVEY, Secretary 
ROBERT A. FRANK, Ass't. Sec'y. 
JAMES CHALMERS, Ass't. Sec'y. 



CRETH & SULLIVAN, INC. 



Representing: 



Established 1881 



General Insurance 



• Aetna Insurance Company 

• American Eagle Insurance Company 

• Boston Insurance Company 

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• National Union Fire Insurance Company 

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324 WALNUT STREET 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



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THIS 1953 HALCYON WAS SET IN 
INTERTYPE WEISS TYPE, WITH HEAD- 
INGS CAST IN LUDLOW GARAMOND 
LIGHT. SEVEN HUNDRED COPIES WERE 
PRINTED ON WARREN'S OFFSET 
ENAMEL PAPER, BOUND IN BLACK 
DUPONT FABRIKOID AND STAMPED 
IN SILVER LEAF AT THE PLANT OF 
THE COMET PRESS, INC., 200 VARICK 
STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



: